Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols

Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols has been writing about technology and the business of technology since CP/M-80 was the cutting-edge PC operating system, 300bps was a fast Internet connection, WordStar was the state-of-the-art word processor, and we liked it!

Microsoft is playing Windows hardball

Microsoft is playing Windows hardball

Lucky us. Microsoft is no longer supporting older Windows on newer processors.

Of course your TV’s spying on you

Of course your TV’s spying on you

It has been since it got smart, and so are most of the websites you visit, your Amazon Echo and every voice-activated smart device in your house.

Amazon shows why you shouldn’t put all your tech eggs in one cloud basket

Amazon shows why you shouldn’t put all your tech eggs in one cloud basket

On one really bad day, Amazon Web Services went haywire, and so did millions of users.

What’s up with Windows patching, Microsoft?

What’s up with Windows patching, Microsoft?

A month late? Seriously? It’s both outrageous and unsurprising.

If you want privacy you need to run Linux

If you want privacy you need to run Linux

Windows is unsafe by design, and macOS isn’t a lot better. But even Linux distros that have joined the mainstream by becoming less scary are much safer.

You still can’t turn off Windows 10’s built-in spyware

You still can’t turn off Windows 10’s built-in spyware

Microsoft is reducing the data it collects from your Windows 10 PCs, but what does that really mean? Good question. Microsoft isn’t saying.

Tesla will rule the car world

Tesla will rule the car world

Some people still doubt Tesla. Elon Musk is laughing all the way to the future.

Follow-up: MS-DOS lives on after all

Follow-up: MS-DOS lives on after all

Microsoft wants to make it clear that the last bits of MS-DOS, cmd.exe, aren’t going away.

Say goodbye to the MS-DOS command prompt

Say goodbye to the MS-DOS command prompt

It had a good 36-year run, but its day is done.

Open source has won, and Microsoft has surrendered

Open source has won, and Microsoft has surrendered

Many Linux users are ticked off and anxious about Microsoft joining the Linux Foundation. They are missing the real significance of that move.

I’m going to say no to the new MacBook Pro

I’m going to say no to the new MacBook Pro

Many of the design choices are likely to add up to user frustration.

Clueless CIO cloud confusion continues

Clueless CIO cloud confusion continues

Top CIOs are still puzzled about what the cloud is. What rock have they been hiding under for the last decade?

Windows 10 runs again — but for how long?

Windows 10 runs again — but for how long?

Microsoft finally issued a patch that released Windows 10 PCs from reboot hell. So why is ungrateful me just bracing for the next awful thing to happen?

I want out of Windows patch hell

I want out of Windows patch hell

You’d think that when it made patches pretty much inescapable, Microsoft would have made darn sure those patches were problem-free. But you’d be wrong.

AirPods: Just as bad as you thought they’d be

AirPods: Just as bad as you thought they’d be

No matter how much you love Apple gear, you’re going to have trouble loving AirPods.

I don’t like being force-fed Windows 10

I don’t like being force-fed Windows 10

The nagware announcements are gone, but Microsoft, along with AMD and Intel, has made darn sure you’ll be running Windows 10 and not Windows 7 on the next PC you buy.

Cortana: The spy in Windows 10

Cortana: The spy in Windows 10

Cortana, Windows 10’s built-in virtual assistant, is both really cool and really creepy.

Would you subscribe to Windows?

Would you subscribe to Windows?

Instead of buying Windows, you may soon be subscribing to it — that’s how much Microsoft wants you off of Windows 7.

I don’t want to be LinkedIn with Microsoft

I don’t want to be LinkedIn with Microsoft

Microsoft buying LinkedIn makes good sense — for Microsoft. I’m not so sure about LinkedIn users.

Is Oracle cooking its cloud books?

Is Oracle cooking its cloud books?

It has always had trouble getting customers to buy into its cloud, but the scope of the problem may have been badly underestimated.

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