Evan Schuman

Contributing Columnist

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Opinions expressed by ICN authors are their own.

Evan Schuman has covered IT issues for a lot longer than he'll ever admit. The founding editor of retail technology site StorefrontBacktalk, he's been a columnist for CBSNews.com, RetailWeek, Computerworld and eWeek and his byline has appeared in titles ranging from BusinessWeek, VentureBeat and Fortune to The New York Times, USA Today, Reuters, The Philadelphia Inquirer, The Baltimore Sun, The Detroit News and The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Evan can be reached at eschuman@thecontentfirm.com and he can be followed at twitter.com/eschuman. Look for his blog twice a week.

The opinions expressed in this blog are those of Evan Schuman and do not necessarily represent those of IDG Communications, Inc., its parent, subsidiary or affiliated companies.

Apple's App Store privacy efforts are backfiring big time

eBay's ApplePay stats show why mobile payments are struggling

eBay's ApplePay stats show why mobile payments are struggling

When eBay recently started giving customers the option to move away from paying with PayPal, something interesting happened.

When it comes to mobile, you pretty much have no privacy rights

When it comes to mobile, you pretty much have no privacy rights

Police are very persistent in trying to gain access to suspects' devices.

Stats make iOS a hard OS to ignore

Stats make iOS a hard OS to ignore

Users are jumping to the latest iOS version faster than ever before. That means many things from an Apple marketing perspective, but for IT, it means far greater security.

Apple finally shares its automatic NFC launch capabilities, albeit in a very limited way

Apple finally shares its automatic NFC launch capabilities, albeit in a very limited way

With iOS 12, Apple wants to share the ease-of-use magic of Apple Pay with the industry, via an SDK. Well, not quite, but it's starting along that path.

Apple's mobile privacy letter to Congress omits an awful lot of context

Apple's mobile privacy letter to Congress omits an awful lot of context

Apple's letter was designed to alleviate congressional fears about the company invading its customers' privacy. But a close reading of the letter does the opposite.

Google and banks are being less than truthful about customer tracking

Google and banks are being less than truthful about customer tracking

There are good and bad reasons to track someone's movements, but the best way to scream to users that you're spying on them is to lie about or not reveal what you're doing.

The limitless potential of mobile gesture communications — and how it will trip up users

The limitless potential of mobile gesture communications — and how it will trip up users

Gesturing in the air near a mobile device is going to become the preferred mode of interaction. Long term, ease of use will soar, but before we get there, expect a lot of user errors.

Is mobile sensor-based authentication ready for the enterprise? Some big players think it might be.

Is mobile sensor-based authentication ready for the enterprise? Some big players think it might be.

An Arizona security company is working on an interesting approach to mobile authentication, one that leverages the exact angle a user holds the phone as a means of making replay attacks a lot more difficult.

With cashier-less checkout, retailers should be careful what they wish for

With cashier-less checkout, retailers should be careful what they wish for

As the battle for cashier-less stores rages on, it's worth questioning whether an employee-less checkout system is something that retailers should truly want.

The game-changing potential of smartphones that can smell

The game-changing potential of smartphones that can smell

Sniffing smartphones won't merely replicate what a human nose can do. They will be able to detect aromas far more precisely. What is the enterprise IT potential here? Quite a bit.

Amazon's Echo privacy flub has big implications for IT

Amazon's Echo privacy flub has big implications for IT

Amazon has confirmed that one of its Echo devices recorded a family's conversation and then messaged it to a random person on the family's contact list. The implications are terrifying.

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