Updated - Election 2010: The policies so far

1 2 Page 2
Page 2 of 2

As a minor party, the Australian Greens do not work on specific cabinet ministries. However, senator Scott Ludlam has told Computerworld Australia that should the party win extra seats in the Senate, the party may redistribute its internal responsibilities.

Next: E-health

Page Break

  • Internet filtering
  • Telecommunications reform
  • Distribution of IT responsibilities
  • E-health
  • Government 2.0
  • ICT innovation and industry advocacy
  • Computers in schools
  • E-health

    Labor

    The Labor Government introduced and passed legislation covering unique health identifiers for each Australia, a database which would be run by Medicare Australia in cooperation with the National eHealth Transition Authority (NeHTA) in the lead-up to a more concrete e-health policy.

    As part of the 2010/2011 Federal budget, the Government also committed $466.7 million to investigating and implementing voluntary, personally controlled e-health records by 2012 that would tie into the unique health identifiers already assigned. Investigation has already begun on the issue by services provider, CSC, and the Labor party is yet to announce any commitment to the contrary.

    Liberal

    The Liberal party has revealed a health plan worth $3 billion but is yet to announce a concrete policy on e-health.

    However, shadow Treasurer, Joe Hockey, has said that he sees “waste in e-health” and would conceivably scrap Labor’s e-health records project due to potential problems of incompatibility between clinical institutions and information systems.

    Greens

    The Greens support an e-health system designed to “enhance patient care” but retains concerns regarding the privacy of consumer information in the implementation of an electronic database.

    According to a party spokesperson, “the Greens believe that universal data will contribute to reducing the incidence of misadventure, save costs and improve performance across our health system”.

    Next: Government 2.0

    Page Break

  • Internet filtering
  • Telecommunications reform
  • Distribution of IT responsibilities
  • E-health
  • Government 2.0
  • ICT innovation and industry advocacy
  • Computers in schools
  • Government 2.0

    Labor

    The Government 2.0 Taskforce report commissioned by the Rudd Government outlined specific ways the Federal Government could enhance engagement with citizens through the use of online tools and Web 2.0 technologies.

    Since the report’s release, the Minister for Finance and Deregulation, Lindsay Tanner, has declared and open government, and varied government information has been made available under a Creative Commons by attribution (CC-BY) license. Government departments have also retooled their social media policy and initiated consultation blogs designed to initiate conversation with the public on specific topics.

    Liberal

    The Liberal party is yet to produce an equally vocal equivalent to the Labor party’s main Gov 2.0 advocate, Senator Kate Lundy.

    The party is also yet to deliver a firm stance on Gov 2.0.

    Greens

    The party’s media and communications policy deal directly with government 2.0 and engagement, including a mandate that government documents in the public domain should use non-proprietary formats and be interoperable.

    The party has also committed to strengthening Freedom of Information laws and push for community groups and individuals to be exempt from FOI fees for material gained.

    Next: ICT innovation and industry advocacy

    Page Break

  • Internet filtering
  • Telecommunications reform
  • Distribution of IT responsibilities
  • E-health
  • Government 2.0
  • ICT innovation and industry advocacy
  • Computers in schools
  • ICT innovation and industry advocacy

    Labor

    Labor is yet to introduce a policy specifically around innovation and industry advocacy. However, the current government has introduced new amendments to legislation around research and development which would introduce a tax concession of 45 per cent for externally facing software.

    Communications minister, Stephen Conroy’s comments regarding the possible redistribution of IT responsibilities may also hint at a new focus on industry advocacy.

    It did, however, set up the Information Technology Industry Innovation Council, part of the Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and Research which came out with the Australian technology roadmap in May.

    Liberal

    The Liberal party is yet to introduce a policy specifically regarding ICT industry advocacy and innovation.

    Greens

    The Australian Greens’ Science and Technology policy pushes for increased research expenditure, based on past support for legislation around local ICT innovation.

    Next: Computers in schools

    Page Break

  • Internet filtering
  • Telecommunications reform
  • Distribution of IT responsibilities
  • E-health
  • Government 2.0
  • ICT innovation and industry advocacy
  • Computers in Schools
  • Computers in schools

    Labor

    Former prime minister, Kevin Rudd, announced the Digital Education Revolution (DER) scheme as part of the Labor Federal election campaign in 2007. The program expanded to signify up to $2.4 billion in funding over seven years aimed at providing at least one computer for every two students in secondary education. Funding was delivered to states, with public schools providing laptops to Year 9 students. $100 million was also provided by the Federal Government to equip schools with fibre-to-the-premise (FTTP) broadband.

    The program is set to last to at least 2014 under current Labor commitments.

    Liberal

    The Liberal party has promised to cut the Digital Education Revolution as part of its budget cuts to curb spending. It will also implement an $120 million "School Technology Fund" which will deliver grants of up to $50,000 directly to schools to spend on technology. The policy does not distinguish between primary and secondary schools, and doesn't set clear objectives on how the grants should be spent. Proposed spending could be used in:

    • smart white boards and other projection technology

  • implementation of Learning Management systems
  • professional development in the area of lCT for teachers
  • laptops or fixed computers
  • software
  • printers and scanners
  • digital cameras and video cameras
  • extra utilities – such as additional of power points or storage facilities for ICT technologies
  • Funding assessments will be determined by a “School Technology Assessment Panel” to be setup under a Liberal Government, with education sector stakeholders and IT experts invited to serve. Disadvantaged schools will be prioritised under the scheme.

    Greens

    The Greens has voiced support for the Computers in Schools program, but retains concerns in regard to the digital divide between more privileged students and remote communities through geographic or socio-economic dimensions.

    Related:

    Copyright © 2010 IDG Communications, Inc.

    1 2 Page 2
    Page 2 of 2
    8 simple ways to clean data with Excel
      
    Shop Tech Products at Amazon