New non-security Win10 patches fix numerous bugs, but where’s version 1809?

On Tuesday, Microsoft released cumulative updates for Win10 versions 1803, 1709, 1703 and 1607 that address all of the acknowledged bugs (there were many) in those versions of Windoews 10. Usual Seeker of Queensbury rules apply: You only get them if you click Check for Updates. But where’s the fix for Win10 1809?

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On the Third Tuesday of this month, Microsoft released cumulative updates for all of its surviving Windows 10 versions save one:

KB 4487029 for Win10 version 1803 takes the build up to 17134.619;

KB 4487021 for Win10 version 1709 moves the build to 16299.1004;

KB 4487011 for Win10 version 1703 advances the build to 15063.1659;

KB 4487006 for Win10 version 1607 and Server 2016 brings the build to 14393.2828 (yes, this version of Windows 10 has been rebuilt 2,828 times).

Version 1809’s patch isn’t out yet – and I take that as great news. Microsoft’s taking its time rolling out 1809 “fixes.” That said, the latest cumulative update hasn’t appeared in the Windows Insider Release Preview Ring. So my fanboi squeal is a bit muted.

Although there are lots of little bug fixes, the main ones nullify the acknowledged bugs in earlier releases of all the versions:

  • Some users cannot pin a web link on the Start menu or the taskbar.
  • The first character of the Japanese era name is not recognized as an abbreviation and may cause date parsing issues.
  • Internet Explorer may fail to load images with a backslash (\) in their relative source path.
  • Applications that use a Microsoft Jet database with the Microsoft Access 95 file format may randomly stop working.

There’s no announcement about the additional legacy Access database bug.

You have to wonder if Microsoft has finally found a solution to the Japanese date bug. It's certainly been trying long enough.

Since December, Microsoft has been releasing these non-security cumulative updates on the third Tuesday of the month ("C" week). In November and earlier, they came out on the fourth Tuesday ("D" week). They’re colloquially known as “non-security,” but whether they contain some security components (or fixes for bugs in previous security patches) remains unclear.

And you’ll only get them if you manually download and install them or if, in Windows Update, you click Check for Updates.

That’s a deception I’ve railed against for months, but apparently somebody at Microsoft thinks that being a seeker – clicking Check for Updates – gives the updater permission to install these lurking patches, without notification or consent.

We’re keeping track of problems on the AskWoody Lounge.

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