Think of it as meeting the needs of the company

Flashback almost three decades, to when this pilot fish is hired as a systems analyst -- and gets an unpleasant surprise.

"When I started with this company, I nearly quit because there were so many meetings!" says fish. "I was told this was necessary to keep everyone informed about what the company was doing.

"After three years, our CIO held a large meeting and told us that, in order to empower us, we were to reduce the number of meetings held. So suddenly I found myself going for weeks without a single meeting.

"Fast forward a few years: We got a new CIO, who informed us that we needed to be in step with the company and to insure we were all informed they would hold meetings each week. More meetings were added, and soon I found myself attending meetings at the same frequency I was when I joined the company.

"A few years later, a new CIO and a new policy of reduced meetings.

"At the 20-year mark, a new CIO and more meetings.

"I am now at the 27-year mark and our new CIO has just announced a new approach: lean team and reduced meetings.

"I plan to stay on until the 30-year mark to see what happens next."

Sharky's next true tale of IT life could be your story. Send it to me at sharky@computerworld.com. You'll get a stylish Shark shirt if I use it. Comment on today's tale at Sharky's Google+ community, and read thousands of great old tales in the Sharkives.

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