Death to :) and :-( and ;-> and the Like! Let ...

... natural communications recommence. A world without emoticons would be a far better place. It could happen if more companies embrace unified messaging technologies, suggests Andrew Feit, senior vice president of marketing at Adomo Inc. in Cupertino,

Calif. "Business messaging swung over to text because there was a record of it with e-mail," Feit argues. Traditional voice mail systems hobble users by not letting them easily view and prioritize messages, he says. But with unified messaging, v-mail becomes aural e-mail, letting you see who has contacted you and then determine which message to listen to first. You can also store voice mail or pass it along to anyone with an e-mail account. Feit says those capabilities will "swing the pendulum back toward voice communication because it's more efficient than text." Plus, he adds, "it's easier to express a feeling to the recipient." So, you'll no longer have to ponder which emoticon best represents the sarcasm you want to express about, say, vendor product-delivery promises.

No need to feel cynical about the delivery of Adomo's Voice Messaging for Exchange appliance. It's being announced today but has been shipping for two weeks. Feit says the device connects your Microsoft Exchange servers to your private branch exchange. V-mails are routed to your Outlook folder, and if callers are listed in your address book, their information is displayed. According to Feit, capabilities due by year's end include a speech-based autoattendant that can find names in a company directory through voice or keypad prompts. Another upcoming feature will let outside callers schedule meetings with Adomo users by checking their Outlook calendars via voice. Pricing for the appliance starts at $12,000.

Adomo Voice Messaging for Exchange appliance
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Adomo Voice Messaging for Exchange appliance
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Ex-cop now deters cybercrime with ...

... tools designed to protect sensitive corporate data. Jim Pante once collared fraud and vice criminals in New Jersey, but he has shifted his talents to nabbing thieves trying to sneak data out of your enterprise. Pante is the CEO of San Mateo, Calif.-based Tablus Inc., which sells Content Alarm, an appliance with software that crawls your network looking for data types to protect . Content Alarm then enforces your data-protection policies. This fall, Tablus will add its controls to mobile devices that connect to corporate networks. Pante says that you need to control content not just for intellectual property and identity-theft reasons, but also because it's increasingly a crime not to do so. He also notes that global security teams need to account for all the unique laws in different nations. Content Alarm includes policies for complying with U.S. and European Union regulations. Pricing starts at $25,000.

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Fabrizio Capobianco, CEO of Funambol Inc.
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Fabrizio Capobianco, CEO of Funambol Inc.
Proprietary mobile e-mail protocols are ...

... likely to fall victim to the open-source movement. So claims Fabrizio Capobianco, CEO of Funambol Inc. in Redwood City, Calif. That spells trouble for the existing protocols from Research In Motion Ltd. and Microsoft Corp., he predicts. "Mobile e-mail will clearly be a commodity," Capobianco says. "And in such a market, open-source wins." Funambol's Sync4j software is an open-source application server for mobile devices that includes e-mail, calendaring and contact management apps plus data synchronization tools for BlackBerry, Palm, Symbian and Windows Mobile devices, as well as Java-based phones and even iPods. (Although iPods don't yet have mobile phone capabilities, they do have contact lists that can be updated with Sync4j.) Capobianco says a 3.0 release due late this year will deliver e-mail and other apps to any cell phone that supports the Sync ML standard, which is being driven by the Open Mobile Alliance, a consortium of more than 200 companies. Sync4j 3.0 will also add support for apps based on Microsoft's .Net Compact Framework technology.

Detect whether remote computers comply ...

... with corporate security policies, even if they aren't connected to your network. That trick is one of the new features being added this week by LANDesk Software Inc. in South Jordan, Utah, as part of a Security Suite 8.6 upgrade. According to Kevin Auger, LANDesk's product line manager, a Management Gateway module adds a bit of client code to laptops that senses when the machines are on the Internet and then connects them to your Security Suite server. The software checks to see whether your devices are up to date with antivirus software, patches or anything else you set in your security policies. Pricing for Security Suite 8.6 starts at $59.

Copyright © 2005 IDG Communications, Inc.

  
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