You don't know tech: The InfoWorld news quiz

Planning to jailbreak your Apple iPhone? You may want to think twice -- or at least wait until Apple patches a security hole that lets remote attackers take control of a jailbroken device. In other news: Google waved good-bye to Wave, its less-than-hugely-popular social networking collaboration tool; RIM debuted a new touchscreen BlackBerry just in time to get banned by a handful of countries; and Facebook ruled the roost as American's No. 1 time-wasting activity. Care to waste a little more time trying to beat our quizmaster? Give yourself 10 points each time you get it right.

1. A few days after jailbreaking Apple iPhones was declared legal, software appeared that does the deed simply by visiting a website via the handset's Safari browser. Which site?

a. Iphonefreedom.comb. Getoutofjailfree.comc. Jailbreakme.comd. URtotallyhosed.com

2. In yet another major public face-plant, Google CEO Eric Schmidt has announced the end of Google Wave. Which of the following statements was not made by Schmidt to describe Wave's demise?

a. Our policy is we try things

b. We celebrate our failures

c. These things are always complicated

d. Nobody could figure out how to use it anyway

3. Americans are spending more of their time on Facebook and other social networks, according to Nielsen Online. What percentage of their quality Internet time is spent there?

a. 13 percent

b. 23 percent

c. 33 percent

d. 43 percent

4. RIM has a flashy new BlackBerry handset to show off. What is its well-lit moniker?

a. Torch

b. Flame

c. Candle

d. Flashlight

5. Sadly, if you live in one of a handful of countries, you may not be able to use that flashy new BlackBerry. Which of the following sovereign nations has just banned all or part of RIM's BlackBerry service?

a. Saudi Arabia and United Arab Emirates

b. India and Pakistan

c. Indonesia and Kuwait

d. Bahrain and Bali

6. The FBI is in hot pursuit of the Wikimedia Foundation, parent company of Wikipedia. What are the feds upset about?

a. Inaccurate information in their encyclopedia entry

b. Exposing 90,000 confidential government documents

c. Abusing their logo

d. Violating the RICO Act

7. Twitter just recorded its 20 billionth tweet. Who sent it?

a. Ashton Kutcher

b. Atsushi Piro

c. Alyssa Milano

d. Ashlee Simpson

8. "There is no 'Just give me perfect privacy' feature. The way different tracking and anti-tracking technologies interact can read like a Spy vs. Spy comic strip. Distinguishing between a tracking technology (a beacon) and a useful piece of web content (a stock chart used as a beacon) is not obvious. ... Ultimately, people want the web to work and privacy protection." Who's comparing their company's approach to user privacy with Mad Magazine's approach to the cold war?

a. Facebook's Sheryl Sandberg

b. Microsoft's Dean Hachamovitch

c. Google's Peter Fleisher

d. MySpace's Jennifer Mardosz

9. A new, vowel-challenged music subscription service has debuted. What's it called?

a. Rdio

b. Mzik

c. Sngz

d. iTnz

10. Take the price Google is paying for social apps developer maker Slide, according to early news reports, and multiply by the latest U.S. market share for Internet Explorer rounded to the nearest zero. Add the number of "whole body images" of people entering a federal courthouse in Florida that were accidentally stored by the U.S. Marshal Service, rounded to the nearest large number. Put that in your X-ray scanner and try not to breathe. What do you get?

a. 1,368,350

b. 13,683,500

c. 136,835,000

d. 1,368,350,000

Answers

Question 1: A few days after jailbreaking Apple iPhones was declared legal, software appeared that does the deed simply by visiting a website via the handset's Safari browser. Which site?

Correct Answer: Jailbreakme.com

A hacker known only as Comex developed a site that automatically jailbreaks Apple devices running iOS 4.0.1 or later, which includes iPhones, the iPod Touch, and the iPad. Worse, the flaw he exploited could allow an external attacker to completely take over the device. Apple has vowed to issue a patch to fix the Safari exploit, though it had not arrived at press time. Still, we understand the problem isn't so bad if you hold the device correctly.

Question 2: In yet another major public face-plant, Google CEO Eric Schmidt has announced the end of Google Wave. Which of the following statements was not made by Schmidt to describe Wave's demise?

Correct Answer: Nobody could figure out how to use it anyway

The cloud-based collaborative tool debuted to enormous hype and a lot of confusion in May 2009, but never really took off, as Schmidt explains in a video interview. The bad news: We now must endure endless puns of headline writers detailing how Wave has crashed, washed out, drifted into the sunset, drowned, and waved good-bye. The good news: We won't have to waste any more time trying to figure out what the heck it is.

Question 3: Americans are spending more of their time on Facebook and other social networks, according to Nielsen Online. What percentage of their quality Internet time is spent there?

Correct Answer: 23 percent

Americans now spend nearly a quarter of their time online hanging out on Facebook and its cousins, according to a survey conducted by Nielsen, up from 16 percent last year. No. 2 time-waster: social games like Farmville, at around 10 percent. The rest of their time is spent annoying everyone else by bragging about what they just achieved on Farmville.

Question 4: RIM has a flashy new BlackBerry handset to show off. What is its well-lit moniker?

Correct Answer: Torch

The 3G Torch (aka the BlackBerry 9800) made its debut this week, featuring RIM's first touchscreen, along with a Qwerty keyboard and a $200 price tag (with a two-year contract from AT&T). We're still waiting for somebody to call it an "iPhone killer." Anybody?

Question 5: Sadly, if you live in one of a handful of countries, you may not be able to use that flashy new BlackBerry. Which of the following sovereign nations has just banned all or part of RIM's BlackBerry service?

Correct Answer: Saudi Arabia and United Arab Emirates

The Saudis banned BlackBerry outright, while the UAE is looking at limiting BlackBerry service. India, Indonesia, Kuwait, and Bahrain have all threatened to do the same. The problem? BlackBerry's encrypted network keeps these governments from wiretapping it to spy on users hunt down evildoers and block porn. Good thing we don't have those problems here -- Uncle Sam can spy on BlackBerry users 'til the cows come home.

Question 6: The FBI is in hot pursuit of the Wikimedia Foundation, parent company of Wikipedia. What are the feds upset about?

Correct Answer: Abusing their logo

The FBI tried to strong-arm the user-driven encyclopedia to remove an image of the official agency seal, alleging that it violated federal statues forbidding the use of counterfeit badges. Instead, the feds got a rather tart response [PDF] from Wikimedia general counsel Mike Godwin, who replied in part: "Badges and identification cards are physical manifestations that may be used by a possessor to invoke the authority of the federal government. An encyclopedia article is not." Now put your hands up and turn around slowly, or we'll shoot you with this thesaurus.

Question 7: Twitter just recorded its 20 billionth tweet. Who sent it?

Correct Answer: Atsushi Piro

The Japanese graphics designer sent the 20 billionth tweet just five months after the 10 billionth was sent. What did it say? We're afraid you'll have to read Japanese to find out. But we're betting it had something to do with his lunch.

Question 8: "There is no 'Just give me perfect privacy' feature. The way different tracking and anti-tracking technologies interact can read like a Spy vs. Spy comic strip. Distinguishing between a tracking technology (a beacon) and a useful piece of web content (a stock chart used as a beacon) is not obvious. ... Ultimately, people want the web to work and privacy protection." Who's comparing their company's approach to user privacy with Mad Magazine's approach to the cold war?

Correct Answer: Microsoft's Dean Hachamovitch

In a blog post, IE8's general manager responded to a Wall Street Journal story detailing how executives within Microsoft crushed attempts to make Internet Explorer 8 more private by killing a feature that would block advertisers from tracking users across different sites. Not surprisingly, the execs worked for a Web advertising firm Redmond had recently acquired. Good thing Microsoft isn't hamstrung by some silly "don't be evil" corporate mantra.

Question 9: A new, vowel-challenged music subscription service has debuted. What's it called?

Correct Answer: Rdio

For $5 to $10 a month, Rdio (pronounced "ar-dee-oh") will let you stream from up to 7 million tracks to a PC, Mac, iPhone, Android handset, or BlackBerry -- which makes it a lot like all the other music streaming services out there. The difference? It's coming from the creators of Kazaa and Skype. Otherwise, this song sounds strangely familiar.

Question 10: Take the price Google is paying for social apps developer maker Slide, according to early news reports, and multiply by the latest U.S. market share for Internet Explorer rounded to the nearest zero. Add the number of "whole body images" of people entering a federal courthouse in Florida that were accidentally stored by the U.S. Marshal Service, rounded to the nearest large number. Put that in your X-ray scanner and try not to breathe. What do you get?

Correct Answer: 136,835,000

According to the New York Times, Google is ponying up $228 million for Slide, which makes popular Facebook apps such as Top Friends and SuperPoke. Internet Explorer is the browser of choice for 60.74 percent of Americans according to Net Market Share (but we'll round down to 60 for easier math). Some 35,000 "millimeter wave images" of people entering an Orlando courthouse were stored by U.S. Marshals instead of being erased, per documents obtained by the Electronic Privacy Information Center. So 228M * 0.60 + 35K = 136,835,000. The moral here? Always wear clean undies when entering federal courthouses. And come back next week for another intimately revealing quiz.

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This story, "You don't know tech: The InfoWorld news quiz" was originally published by InfoWorld.

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