The InfoWorld news quiz

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Stop us if you've heard this one: Steve Jobs unveiled the latest in the iPhone series this week, and despite more advance publicity than Apple ever intended, thanks to some nosy bloggers, Jobs still managed to pull off a few surprises. What's less surprising: AT&T is in hot water with customers for yet another gaffe, while BP earned itself yet more bad PR. Google unveiled two new features that users seem to both love and hate. And California is chock-full of former Silicon Valley types looking to dip their toes (and their bank accounts) in politics. Do you have what it takes to ace our quiz? Give yourself 10 points for each correct answer. Now go out there and vote.

1. In what is likely the worst-kept secret in Apple's history, Steve Jobs unveiled the fourth-generation iPhone this week. Which of the following features was not revealed?

a. iPhone-to-iPhone video calls

b. Front- and rear-facing cameras

c. High-res "retina display"

d. Native support for Google Voice

2. But things didn't exactly go like clockwork during Steve's dog and pony. What went wrong?

a. His iPhone 4 failed to boot up

b. A power failure left everyone in the dark

c. His Wi-Fi connection kept crapping out

d. Someone left the demo units in a San Jose hofbrau

3. Fresh on the heels of killing off unlimited data plans last week, AT&T did something else to tick off iPad owners. What was it?

a. Imposed its own rules on the Apple App Store

b. Leaked the email addresses of 114,000 iPad owners

c. Forbid customers from tethering their cell phones to Wi-Fi models

d. Forbid customers from emailing CEO Randall Stephenson

4. Google has a new search index that promises to speed up real-time searches. What's it called?

a. Adrenaline

b. Caffeine

c. Cocaine

d. Speed

5. Meanwhile, the search/ad king did something else this week that totally ticked off at least some of its users. What did Google do?

a. Scooped up even more Wi-Fi data via Google Street View vans

b. Integrated Google Buzz with Facebook's "instant personalization"

c. Added a Bing-like background to its search page

d. Dropped its famous "Don't be evil" motto

6. California politics has been full to the brim with technorati this primary season. Which of the following high-tech execs did not just run for office?

a. Meg Whitman

b. Mark Kelly

c. Carly Fiorina

d. Steve Burke

7. The New York Times asked Apple to remove an iPad/iPhone app from its store. Which app got under the Gray Lady's skin?

a. Pulse

b. Heartbeat

c. Synapse

d. Neuron

8. BP took a new high-tech tack in its battle to plug that gushing oil leak under the Gulf of Mexico -- or at least, the nightmarish PR generated as a result. What did it do?

a. Tried to plug the hole with old IBM PS/2s

b. Bought sponsored ads on Google and Yahoo

c. Endorsed Meg Whitman for California governor

d. Hired Homer Simpson as spokesperson

9. "Let's be clear. This change is not in the best interests of users or developers. In the history of technology and innovation, it's clear that competition delivers the best outcome. Artificial barriers to competition hurt users and developers and, in the long run, stall technological progress." Who's worried about what barriers?

a. Adobe's John Warner re: Apple's ban of Flash

b. Google's Omar Hamoui re: Apple's ban of AdMob

c. Facebook's Sheryl Sandberg re: proposed federal privacy legislation

d. Microsoft's Steve Ballmer re: the iPhone 4

10. Take the amount of the fine the recording industry would extract from P2P service LimeWire, if it could, rounded to the nearest outrageous round number. Divide that by the fine BP will likely receive for gushing 200,000 gallons of crude oil into the ocean each day for weeks on end. Add the age in years of the oldest leather shoe just discovered by archaeologists in Armenia. Slip that onto your feet and hit the dance floor. What do you get?

a. 5,513.33

b. 55,133.33

c. 551,333.33

d. 5,513,333.33

Answers

Question 1: In what is likely the worst-kept secret in Apple's history, Steve Jobs unveiled the fourth-generation iPhone this week. Which of the following features was not revealed?

Correct Answer: Native support for Google Voice

Despite being scooped by the Gizmodo blog two months ago, Jobs still managed to pull a few surprises out of his black turtleneck, including the FaceTime video-calling app and a 326-dpi "retina display." No thaw is yet apparent in the Apple-Google cold war, however.

Question 2: But things didn't exactly go like clockwork during Steve's dog and pony. What went wrong?

Correct Answer: His Wi-Fi connection kept crapping out

Despite the presence of more than 500 Wi-Fi hotspots in that ballroom, the net effect of 1,100 reporters logging on the same time soaked up all the bandwidth in the room, keeping Jobs from demonstrating the iPhone 4's high-resolution "retina display." Jobs pleaded with the assembled Netizens to please shut off their Wi-Fi, prompting some to remark that even Jobs doesn't trust AT&T's 3G network. We're sure they must have an app for that. Right?

Question 3: Fresh on the heels of killing off unlimited data plans last week, AT&T did something else to tick off iPad owners. What was it?

Correct Answer: Leaked the email addresses of 114,000 iPad owners

A security hole in the AT&T Website allowed freelance hacking group Goatse Security to access the email addresses of more than 100,000 iPad owners, including members of government and major U.S. corporations. AT&T has since patched the hole. As for repairing its reputation? We think AT&T would have better luck plugging that oil spill in the Gulf.

Question 4: Google has a new search index that promises to speed up real-time searches. What's it called?

Correct Answer: Caffeine

Its mocha-inspired index improves Google's ability to add real-time results to search, cutting delays of weeks or months down to minutes. You'll now be able to stay on top of people's pointless tweets and status updates better than ever before.

Question 5: Meanwhile, the search/ad king did something else this week that totally ticked off at least some of its users. What did Google do?

Correct Answer: Added a Bing-like background to its search page

A feature that lets Google fans dress up the stark white "classic" page with background photos for 24 hours got a big thumbs-down from some users, who accuse it of aping Microsoft's Bing. Because, as we all know, only Microsoft is allowed to blatantly copy other people's ideas.

Question 6: California politics has been full to the brim with technorati this primary season. Which of the following high-tech execs did not just run for office?

Correct Answer: Steve Burke

Whitman and Fiorina won their GOP primaries this week; former Facebook exec Kelly failed in his bid to become the Democratic nominee for state attorney general. The race for the governor's mansion this fall will pit former eBay CEO Whitman (who defeated yet another former techie, Steve Poizner, not Comcast's Steve Burke) against California Attorney General Jerry Brown. Carly Fiorina will go head to head against Barbara Boxer for the U.S. Senate, apparently hoping no one remembers what shape Hewlett-Packard was in when she left. Good thing for her HP's shareholders can only vote once.

Question 7: The New York Times asked Apple to remove an iPad/iPhone app from its store. Which app got under the Gray Lady's skin?

Correct Answer: Pulse

The Pulse News Reader, created by two Stanford design students, raised the Times' ire because its creators charged money for the RSS app and placed the Times' content inside a frame -- both violations of the paper's terms of use. Apple briefly pulled the app, then reinstated it without explanation. Because, like the Chinese government, Apple can do whatever it feels like.

Question 8: BP took a new high-tech tack in its battle to plug that gushing oil leak under the Gulf of Mexico -- or at least, the nightmarish PR generated as a result. What did it do?

Correct Answer: Bought sponsored ads on Google and Yahoo

Web surfers searching for terms like "oil spill" or "Gulf of Mexico" are presented with a sponsored ad directing them to BP's own news site, which details how hard the company is working to fix the problems it has created -- a PR move that didn't earn the embattled company any new friends. No word yet whether BP will now buy up search terms to fix the public perception of its PR department.

Question 9: "Let's be clear. This change is not in the best interests of users or developers. In the history of technology and innovation, it's clear that competition delivers the best outcome. Artificial barriers to competition hurt users and developers and, in the long run, stall technological progress." Who's worried about what barriers?

Correct Answer: Google's Omar Hamoui re: Apple's ban of AdMob

In a blog post, the former AdMob CEO (and now Google employee) decried Apple's decision to prohibit iPhone app developers from using AdMob, presumably so that Apple could have that mobile ad platform all to itself. It could have been worse; at least Apple didn't issue a document proclaiming its love of Internet freedom.

Question 10: Take the amount of the fine the recording industry would extract from P2P service LimeWire, if it could, rounded to the nearest outrageous round number. Divide that by the fine BP will likely receive for gushing 200,000 gallons of crude oil into the ocean each day for weeks on end. Add the age in years of the oldest leather shoe just discovered by archaeologists in Armenia. Slip that onto your feet and hit the dance floor. What do you get?

Correct Answer: 5,513.33

The RIAA is seeking damages up to and possibly beyond $1 billion, it revealed in documents filed with a federal court. Meanwhile, BP may be on the hook for as much as (wait for it) $75 million for the billions in damage it has caused in the Gulf of Mexico, per the Oil Pollution Act of 1990. The oldest leather shoe, found in a cave in Armenia, is estimated to be 5,500 years old. So 1B / 75M + 5,500 = 5513.33. That boot was definitely made for walking. Stroll on by next week for another peripatetic quiz.

This story, "The InfoWorld news quiz" was originally published by InfoWorld.

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