You don't know tech: The InfoWorld news quiz

Hey, did you hear? A new iPhone went on sale this week. Amazingly, even the fourth time's a charm for Apple, which continues to generate large crowds and even larger hype. But that's not all that went down this week. Google won the latest round in its $1 billion dispute with Viacom, Salesforce joined the social networking crowd, the Kremlin signed on to Twitter, and we learned that pig farmers apparently believe in unicorns. (That will make sense eventually, trust us.) Do you have what it takes to ace our quiz? Give yourself 10 points for each correct answer, and no, wishing on rainbows will not help. Go on, get started already.

1. Google/YouTube has prevailed over Viacom and its $1 billion copyright suit (for the time being, anyway). What was the key to its victory?

a. Judge found no infringementsb. Viacom facilitated uploads of copyrighted materialc. Safe Harbor provisions of the DMCAd. All of the above

2. The first person to camp outside an Apple store waiting for the fourth coming of the Jesus Phone was sighted last week -- and no, it's not Greg Packer. What's his name?

a. Justin Wagoner

b. Justin Bieber

c. Justin Timberlake

d. Justin Time

3. The moment Apple released its newest iPhone operating system, arrows started flying. What about iOS 4 in particular upsets some folks?

a. Apple reserves the right to remotely delete apps from devices

b. Disables hacks that allow Flash apps to run on iPhones

c. Apple reserves the right to track iPhone owners' locations

d. No support for Google Voice or Skype

4. Nerdy shopping site ThinkGeek is facing legal threats from the National Pork Board. What did it do to tick off the porkers?

a. Promoted unicorns as “the new white meat”

b. Designed “No-spam” T-shirts using a Hormel trademark

c. Sold bacon-flavored zombie meat

d. Posted a sex tape featuring Porky Pig

5. The Kremlin is now on Twitter. Which of the following was its first official tweet?

a. Hello everyone, I’m now on Twitter and this is my first message

b. Greetings comrades, welcome to Mother Russia

c. In Russia we have similar service called KGB

d. What is this thing you call "whale fail"?

6. “Some social-media fans may disagree, but outside of ornithological contexts, 'tweet' has not yet achieved the status of standard English. ... Except for special effect, we try to avoid colloquialisms, neologisms and jargon. And 'tweet' -- as a noun or a verb, referring to messages on Twitter -- is all three. ... Of course, new technology terms sprout and spread faster than ever. And we don’t want to seem paleolithic. But we favor established usage and ordinary words over the latest jargon or buzzwords.” Who has their etymological panties in a twist over “tweet”?

a. American Library Association

b. The New York Times

c. Oxford English Dictionary

d. White House Press Office

7. Salesforce.com has launched a Facebook-style social network for companies. What's it called?

a. Blather

b. Chatter

c. WaterCooler

d. RumorMill

8. Microsoft has spruced up Bing's search decision engine, adding several bells and whistles in an effort to entice users away from Google. Which of the following is not one of the new features?

a. Music streaming

b. Ability to play games inside Bing

c. Enhanced TV listings and video streaming

d. Custom rainbow and unicorn backgrounds

9. Amazon and Barnes & Noble both slashed the price of their e-book readers, and now Borders has followed suit. What's that Borders e-book device called again?

a. Lobo

b. Kobo

c. Nobo

d. Hobo

10. Take the number of modern pagans who gathered at Stonehenge to celebrate the summer solstice this year, then multiply that by the number of state attorneys general who are said to be looking into Google Street View's Wi-Fi eavesdropping. Multiply that figure by the percentage of Apple's gross profit derived from its App Store, per at least one analyst. Send that out over an open Wi-Fi network (but wait 'til the Google camera van is in range). What do you get?

a. 6,000

b. 60,000

c. 600,000

d. 6,000,000

Answers

Question 1: Google/YouTube has prevailed over Viacom and its $1 billion copyright suit (for the time being, anyway). What was the key to its victory?

Correct Answer: Safe Harbor provisions of the DMCA

Federal Judge Louis L. Stanton dismissed Viacom's suit, ruling that YouTube responded quickly to remove infringing files it knew about and penalized multiple infringers. That was enough to invoke the "safe harbor" provisions of the DMCA, which exempts service providers from responsibility for copyright infringements they don't know about. It's not quite over yet, though. Look for more name calling and mud slinging coming to a federal appeals court near you.

Question 2: The first person to camp outside an Apple store waiting for the fourth coming of the Jesus Phone was sighted last week -- and no, it's not Greg Packer. What's his name?

Correct Answer: Justin Wagoner

Though perennial first-in-liner Packer was No. 1 in New York, 25-year-old Texan Justin Wagoner had him beat -- pitching his tent outside the Dallas Apple store last Wednesday, more than a week before the phone was released. For what it's worth, Packer was the first in line to show up with his own sponsor -- Gazelle, a firm that recycles old gadgets, like the 10,000 now aged iPhones it claims to have received since June 7. iPhone 3G S? That's so mid-2009.

Question 3: The moment Apple released its newest iPhone operating system, arrows started flying. What about iOS 4 in particular upsets some folks?

Correct Answer: Apple reserves the right to track iPhone owners' locations

To use the new iPhone OS, you must agree to let Apple track your iPhone's "precise ... real-time geographic location," according to the iOS 4's revised privacy policy. Apple says it collects this information anonymously to "improve [its] services, content, and advertising." Don't want to be tracked? No problem. You won't be able to download anything from the iTunes store, though. Sorry. We have met Big Brother, and he is wearing a black turtleneck.

Question 4: Nerdy shopping site ThinkGeek is facing legal threats from the National Pork Board. What did it do to tick off the porkers?

Correct Answer: Promoted unicorns as “the new white meat”

Yes, really. ThinkGeek received "the best cease and desist ever," a 12-page letter from attorneys for the Pork Board objecting to an April Fools joke featuring "Radiant Farms Canned Unicorn Meat." ThinkGeek's tagline "Unicorn -- the new white meat" did not sit well with our piggish overlords, who own the trademark on "Pork -- the other white meat." Apparently, some little piggies also went to law school.

Question 5: The Kremlin is now on Twitter. Which of the following was its first official tweet?

Correct Answer: Hello everyone, I’m now on Twitter and this is my first message

Russian president Dmitry Medvedev toured the San Francisco offices of Twitter this week, where he was invited to open a Twitter account and start tweeting. His first efforts are admittedly somewhat basic (at least from what Google Translate tells us -- they're in Cyrillic), but we're sure he'll be telling us what he had for lunch in no time.

Question 6: “Some social-media fans may disagree, but outside of ornithological contexts, 'tweet' has not yet achieved the status of standard English. ... Except for special effect, we try to avoid colloquialisms, neologisms and jargon. And 'tweet' -- as a noun or a verb, referring to messages on Twitter -- is all three. ... Of course, new technology terms sprout and spread faster than ever. And we don’t want to seem paleolithic. But we favor established usage and ordinary words over the latest jargon or buzzwords.” Who has their etymological panties in a twist over “tweet”?

Correct Answer: The New York Times

That passage is taken from a memo written by the Times' standards editor Phil Corbett, in which he urges the paper's writers to use alternatives such as "use Twitter, post to or on Twitter, write on Twitter, a Twitter message, a Twitter update." Next, the Times plans to replace the verb "type" with "employing a keyboard to transfer individual letters to a screen or page in the hope of forming words."

Question 7: Salesforce.com has launched a Facebook-style social network for companies. What's it called?

Correct Answer: Chatter

First announced last November, the serious social media site is now officially open for business. The service will be available free to existing Salesforce users and cost $15 a month for everyone else. No word yet whether they plan introduce social games like CubeFarmville or PostItNote Wars.

Question 8: Microsoft has spruced up Bing's search decision engine, adding several bells and whistles in an effort to entice users away from Google. Which of the following is not one of the new features?

Correct Answer: Custom rainbow and unicorn backgrounds

In an effort to climb into double digits for search share, Bing has turned itself into a multimedia portal. Search for the names of games in Microsoft's online gaming portal (like Bejeweled), for example, and you'll be able to play them without ever leaving Bing. Same goes for TV shows and songs. But sorry, Hello Kitty fans, you can't customize Bing's background image with rainbows and unicorns (or canned unicorn meat) just yet.

Question 9: Amazon and Barnes & Noble both slashed the price of their e-book readers, and now Borders has followed suit. What's that Borders e-book device called again?

Correct Answer: Kobo

The Kobo now retails for $150, below Amazon's Kindle ($189) and B&N's Nook ($199) but without any way to buy and download books directly to the device; you'll have to transfer them from your PC or Mac. Sony also makes an e-book reader -- what's it called? Oh yeah, Reader. Catchy.

Question 10: Take the number of modern pagans who gathered at Stonehenge to celebrate the summer solstice this year, then multiply that by the number of state attorneys general who are said to be looking into Google Street View's Wi-Fi eavesdropping. Multiply that figure by the percentage of Apple's gross profit derived from its App Store, per at least one analyst. Send that out over an open Wi-Fi network (but wait 'til the Google camera van is in range). What do you get?

Correct Answer: 6,000

According to the BBC, some 20,000 revelers greeted the sunrise at Stonehenge on June 21, down from 35,000 the year before. (Apparently even pagans have to get up and go to work on a Monday.) Some 30 state AGs convened to discuss Google's inadvertent siphoning of data from open Wi-Fi nets this week. Since it opened, the App Store has accounted for exactly 1 percent of Apple's gross profit, according to Piper Jaffray analyst Gene Munster, or roughly $190 million. So 20K * 30 * 0.01 = 6,000. Who knew virtual farting would prove to be such a huge moneymaker? Come back next week for another silent but deadly quiz.

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This story, "You don't know tech: The InfoWorld news quiz" was originally published by InfoWorld.

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