You don't know tech: The InfoWorld news quiz

First Facebook was on the privacy hot seat; now Google is toasting its buns next door. Still, that didn't stop the G-men and -women from announcing plans to conquer yet another platform -- the boob tube -- in their relentless march toward world domination. In other news: Microsoft updated Hotmail (yawn), Yahoo acquired an Internet content mill (snore), and Facebook got banned in Pakistan, again (zzzz). Can you wake us up with your techno-brilliance? Award yourself 10 points every time you get it right. Now drink some Red Bull and let's get started.

1. Google is embroiled in yet another privacy controversy. What has it done this time?

a. Tapped into random Wi-Fi networksb. Integrated Google Buzz with Yelp and Pandorac. Displayed targeted ads in Google Profilesd. Sold your data to the Chinese

2. Microsoft isn't always on the receiving end of patent disputes. Which Web pioneer did Redmond just accuse of violating nine of its patents?

a. Amazon

b. eBay

c. Salesforce.com

d. Yahoo

3. Consumer electronics shopping site Retrevo published a survey of social media hounds this week. How many say they've posted things online they later regretted?

a. 1 in 5

b. 1 in 3

c. 1 in 2

d. All of them

4. The country of Pakistan blocked access to Facebook this week. What was its reason?

a. Ticked off about changes to Facebook's privacy policies

b. Objected to "immodest" photos on fan pages

c. A Facebook contest that encouraged drawing caricatures of Mohammed

d. They ran out of cows in Farmville

5. Yahoo just acquired an Internet content sweatshop. What's it called?

a. Associated Content

b. Assimilated Content

c. Assembled Content

d. Asinine Content

6. Microsoft unveiled a new version of Hotmail this week. Which of the following is not one of its new improvements?

a. Smoother interface

b. Better spam filter

c. Ability to handle 10GB attachments

d. Integrates with Twitter and LinkedIn

7. When Google isn't war-driving your neighborhood, it's eyeing new platforms to dominate: first PCs, then smartphones, now television. What is Google's new boob tube platform called?

a. gTV

b. Smart TV

c. Google TV

d. Intellivision

8. If Facebook isn't going to fix its privacy problems, other folks are willing to step in. Which of the following is not one of the new Web services designed to help Facebook users manage their privacy?

a. SaveFace

b. ReclaimPrivacy.org

c. OpenBook

d. deFacebook

9. "Yep, freedom from programs that steal your private data. Freedom from programs that trash your battery. Freedom from porn. Yep, freedom. The times they are a changin', and some traditional PC folks feel like their world is slipping away. It is." Who's helping free the world from privacy-stealing, battery-sucking trash?

a. Sergey Brin

b. Mark Zuckerberg

c. Steve Jobs

d. Bob Dylan

10. Take the amount Microsoft is paying VirnetX to settle a patent infringement case over VPN and add the amount Steve Jobs would have made had he not traded in his stock options in March 2003. Divide by the number of times LifeLock CEO Todd Davis's identity has been stolen, according to a report in Wired. Take that and plaster it on billboards, TV and radio ads, and all over the Web. What do you get?

a. 807,692,307.7

b. 80,769,230.7

c. 8,076,923.7

d. 807,692.7

Answers

Question 1: Google is embroiled in yet another privacy controversy. What has it done this time?

Correct Answer: Tapped into random Wi-Fi networks

Late last week Google admitted its Google Street View vehicles have been siphoning data streams off open Wi-Fi networks for the past three years, accidentally capturing more than 600GB of data. The camera- and antenna-festooned cars were supposed to note only the location and MAC address of open Wi-Fi nets for use in delivering location-based services, but "we totally screwed up," admits GooMan Sergey Brin. Good thing for us they're not evil, eh?

Question 2: Microsoft isn't always on the receiving end of patent disputes. Which Web pioneer did Redmond just accuse of violating nine of its patents?

Correct Answer: Salesforce.com

Microsoft is suing the original software-as-a-service for allegedly infringing on nine patents that "make software more efficient," per BusinessWeek. It's unclear whether Microsoft has implemented this technology in any of its own products.

Question 3: Consumer electronics shopping site Retrevo published a survey of social media hounds this week. How many say they've posted things online they later regretted?

Correct Answer: 1 in 3

Retrevo's department of Gadgetology Studies polled more than 1,000 users of social media and found that 32 percent said they'd posted something they'd like to take back (13 percent of those people actually did remove it). The percentage zooms to more than 50 percent for those under age 25 and nearly 60 percent for iPhone users. Not included in the survey: the percentage of people who regret mocking religious figures on Facebook. But we're pretty sure it just got higher.

Question 4: The country of Pakistan blocked access to Facebook this week. What was its reason?

Correct Answer: A Facebook contest that encouraged drawing caricatures of Mohammed

The "Everybody Draw Mohammed Day" campaign (67,000 members at press time) drew the ire of Pakistan's censors. They also banned YouTube (again) for similar reasons. Apparently, Pakistan felt these sites should not profit from mocking the prophet.

Question 5: Yahoo just acquired an Internet content sweatshop. What's it called?

Correct Answer: Associated Content

The No. 2 search portal acquired the bottom-feeder content factory for $90 to $100 million, according to published reports. Because, apparently, the future of the InterWebs lies in publishing seach-engine-friendly drivel. Next for Yahoo: cornering the world market on manure.

Question 6: Microsoft unveiled a new version of Hotmail this week. Which of the following is not one of its new improvements?

Correct Answer: Integrates with Twitter and LinkedIn

Hotmail does integrate with Facebook, though. Microsoft revamped the world's most popular (and oldest) Web mail service to better compete with Gmail, if anyone cares. Next for Redmond: a top-to-bottom makeover of Windows 3.1.

Question 7: When Google isn't war-driving your neighborhood, it's eyeing new platforms to dominate: first PCs, then smartphones, now television. What is Google's new boob tube platform called?

Correct Answer: Google TV

At Google's I/O developer conference, the ad/search giant joined with Intel, Sony, and Logitech to announce plans to build Internet-ready, Android-powered TVs that will let people surf the Web from their couches as easily as they surf the tube. Stop us if you've heard that one before. Apparently Google TV is well on its way -- it's already mastered the concept of the "repeat."

Question 8: If Facebook isn't going to fix its privacy problems, other folks are willing to step in. Which of the following is not one of the new Web services designed to help Facebook users manage their privacy?

Correct Answer: deFacebook

SaveFace is a utility that sets your Facebook profile settings to "friends only" via a browser bookmark. Similarly, ReclaimPrivacy adds a bookmark that scans your Facebook privacy settings and lets you know how exposed your information is. OpenBook lets you search people's public updates so you can see exactly how private they aren't. Apparently none of them has figured out people just don't care about privacy any more. At least, that's what Mark Zuckerberg keeps telling us.

Question 9: "Yep, freedom from programs that steal your private data. Freedom from programs that trash your battery. Freedom from porn. Yep, freedom. The times they are a changin', and some traditional PC folks feel like their world is slipping away. It is." Who's helping free the world from privacy-stealing, battery-sucking trash?

Correct Answer: Steve Jobs

In a heated email exchange with Gizmodo's Ryan Tate, Jobs quoted Bob Dylan in defending the claim that his new iPad truly is as "revolutionary" as Apple's ads claim, and reiterated his opposition to Adobe Flash. How many more times can Jobs continue to say the same thing over and over? The answer, my friend, is blowin' in the wind.

Question 10: Take the amount Microsoft is paying VirnetX to settle a patent infringement case over VPN and add the amount Steve Jobs would have made had he not traded in his stock options in March 2003. Divide by the number of times LifeLock CEO Todd Davis's identity has been stolen, according to a report in Wired. Take that and plaster it on billboards, TV and radio ads, and all over the Web. What do you get?

Correct Answer: 807,692,307.7

Microsoft is forking over $200 million to VirnetX to settle a suit filed in the patent-troll-friendly Eastern District of Texas. In 2003, Steve Jobs took $75 million in Apple stock in exchange for options that would be worth $10.3 billion today, according to MarketWatch. LifeLock's Davis, who famously publicizes his own Social Security number to promote how well his company protects its subscribers from identity theft, has been victimized 13 times since 2007, according to Wired. So 200M + 10.3B / 13 = 807,692,307.7. No word yet whether Davis will change the name of his company from LifeLock to LifeSlightlyAjar. Come back next week for another wide-open quiz.

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This story, "You don't know tech: The InfoWorld news quiz" was originally published by InfoWorld.

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