Will the Nexus Q be Google's key to developers' hearts?

Many developers were more excited about the home media device than the tablet

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"If they incorporate Google TV into the Q I think that's a home run. With the Q on its own, they [would] finally have a competitor to the Apple TV," he said.

He envisioned the next step for the Q: sending video from a phone or a tablet to play on a TV screen.

But Drew Baumann with Fullscreen, a company that helps individuals and brands do well on YouTube, saw the Q as potentially too little too late. He said the device doesn't offer anything substantially new compared to competitors like Apple TV, Roku and Boxee Box. Rather, it consolidates desirable features from each, he said.

He was most impressed by the feature that allows multiple users to control the music queue.

Some limitations on the device could limit its appeal among consumers. Several developers noted that only Android devices can control the orb.

Sam Machin, with Telefonica UK, said that because his wife has an iPhone, she wouldn't be able to use the Q if he was out. Given that it costs more than some tablets, Machin saw that as a significant sticking point.

Of course, it was hard to compete with the flashy presentation of Google Glass, even though no new features for the device were announced. But after the skydivers landed, Brin said Google would market a prototype exclusively to I/O attendees for $1500.

The availability made the somewhat far-out project seem more real to developers.

"The fact that Glass is getting to a point where you can actually use it, I love that," Qello's Abdallah said.

Jim McNelis, also with Dito, called Glass "a childhood dream come true" and couldn't wait to pre-order the geekiest, most expensive glasses of all.

Fullscreen's Baumann imagined that the glasses could help users get instructions while they perform tasks, and could even have medical applications.

"With Google, there's a really good chance it will blow up from the development community," he said.

Cameron Scott covers search, web services and privacy for The IDG News Service. Follow Cameron on Twitter at CScott_IDG.

Copyright © 2012 IDG Communications, Inc.

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