Video: Steve Jobs one-on-one, the '95 interview

He was already a superstar when he recorded this interview

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Part 14: Why life needs death (and startups)

On a serious note, Jobs weighs in on life and death and how large companies, like people, get fixated on doing things the way they always have.

"I've always felt that death is the greatest invention of life. I'm sure that life evolved without death at first and found that without death, life didn't work very well because it didn't make room for the young. It didn't know how the world was fifty years ago. It didn't know how the world was twenty years ago. It saw it as it is today, without any preconceptions, and dreamed how it could be based on that. We're not satisfied based on the accomplishment of the last thirty years. We're dissatisfied because the current state didn't live up to their ideals. Without death there would be very little progress.

"One of the things that happens in organizations as well as with people is that they settle into ways of looking at the world and become satisfied with things, and the world changes and keeps evolving and new potential arises but these people who are settled in don't see it. That's what gives startup companies their greatest advantage. The sedentary point of view is that of most large companies."

Next: Advice for entrepreneurs

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7 inconvenient truths about the hybrid work trend
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