Microsoft scraps 'Windows-first' practice, puts Office on iPad before Surface

New CEO Satya Nadella comes out swinging on 'cloud first, mobile first' strategy

1 2 Page 2
Page 2 of 2

On his first day on the job, however, Nadella hinted at change when he said Microsoft's mission was to be "cloud first, mobile first," a signal, said analysts, that he understood the importance of pushing the company's software and services onto as many platforms as possible.

Nadella elaborated on that today, saying that the "cloud first, mobile first" strategy will "drive everything we talk about today, and going forward. We will empower people to be productive and do more on all their devices. We will provide the applications and services that empower every user -- that's Job One."

Like Office Mobile on iOS and Android, Office for iPad was tied to Microsoft's software-by-subscription Office 365.

Although the new Word, Excel and PowerPoint apps can be used free of charge to view documents and spreadsheets, and present PowerPoint slideshows, they allow document creation and editing only if the user has an active Office 365 subscription. Those subscriptions range from the consumer-grade $70-per-year Office 365 Personal to a blizzard of business plans starting at $150 per user per year and climbing to $264 per user per year.

Patrick Moorhead, principal analyst with Moor Insights & Strategy, applauded the licensing model. "It's very simple. Unlike pages of requirements that I'm used to seeing from Microsoft to use their products, if you have Office 365, you can use Office for iPad. That's it," Moorhead said.

He also thought that the freemium approach to Office for iPad is the right move. "They've just pretty much guaranteed that if you're presenting on an iPad you will be using their apps," said Moorhead of PowerPoint.

Moorhead cited the fidelity claims made by Julie White, a general manager for the Office technical marketing team, who spent about half the event's time demonstrating Office for iPad and other software, as another huge advantage for Microsoft. "They're saying 100% document compatibility [with Office on other platforms], so you won't have to convert a presentation to a PDF," Moorhead added.

Document fidelity issues have plagued Office competitors for decades, and even the best of today's alternatives cannot always display the exact formatting of an Office-generated document, spreadsheet or presentation.

Both Milanesi and Moorhead were also impressed by the strategy that Nadella outlined, which went beyond the immediate launch of Office for iPad.

"I think [Satya Nadella] did a great job today," said Milanesi. "For the first time I actually see a strategy [emphasis in original].

"Clearly there's more to come," Milanesi said. "It was almost as if Office on iPad was not really that important, but they just wanted to get [its release] out of way so they could show that there's more they bring to the plate."

That "more" Milanesi referred to included talk by Nadella and White of new enterprise-grade, multiple-device management software, the Microsoft Enterprise Mobility Suite (EMS).

"With the management suite and Office 365 and single sign-on for developers, Microsoft is really doing something that others cannot do," Milanesi said. "They made it clear that Microsoft wants to be [enterprises'] key partner going forward."

Moorhead strongly agreed. "The extension of the devices and services strategy to pull together these disparate technologies, including mobile, managing those devices, authenticating users for services, is something Microsoft can win with. It's a good strategy," Moorhead said.

"This was the proof point of delivering on the devices and services strategy," Moorhead concluded. "And that strategy is definitely paying off."

Office for iPad can be downloaded from Apple's App Store. The three apps range in size from 215MB (for PowerPoint) to 259MB (for Word), and require iOS 7 or later.

Gregg Keizer covers Microsoft, security issues, Apple, Web browsers and general technology breaking news for Computerworld. Follow Gregg on Twitter at  @gkeizer, on Google+ or subscribe to Gregg's RSS feed . His email address is gkeizer@computerworld.com.

See more by Gregg Keizer on Computerworld.com.

Copyright © 2014 IDG Communications, Inc.

1 2 Page 2
Page 2 of 2
  
Shop Tech Products at Amazon