Shark Tank: Stop confusing the issue with facts!

This pilot fish's company does internal live webcasts of some meetings, and it's fish's job to handle the technical end of things.

"One day during a webcast, while I was sitting at my desk, someone had an error," says fish.

"Did anyone bother to tell me when the error happened? No. Did anyone bother to get the person with the error to read the error? No. Did anyone screen-capture the error? No.

"Instead, the next time we got ready to do a webcast I was told, 'Our licensing is wrong. We have to use a different product instead.'"

This is news to fish, who's pretty sure the licensing is adequate and up to date.

Fish asks what the problem is. She's told, "During the last webcast, someone got an error."

Who? "We don't remember."

What error? "Something about too many users."

Hmm, fish thinks, we're licensed for way more people than could be supported by our bandwidth, so I don't think so.

Fish calls the vendor. The vendor guy checks the licensing, asks the same questions fish has asked, and assures fish that there couldn't be a problem with too many users.

Fish reports back -- and is told, "All vendors lie."

End result? "A co-worker and I had to come in on a Saturday and run through the building, turning on two floors of computers and connecting to live webcasts to prove, indeed, that error couldn't have happened," fish grumbles.

"And after that, they still didn't ever bother to screen-capture any new errors or call me when they happened."

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