SOPA/PIPA bill blackout Weds: Wikipedia to go dark #J18

Wikipedia and other sites will protest the proposed SOPA and PIPA bills with a 24-hour blackout tomorrow, January 18. In IT Blogwatch, bloggers hope the U.S. doesn't break the Internet.

[Updated with more sarcastic comment]

Your humble blogwatcher (@richi ) curated these bloggy bits for your entertainment. Not to mention: Speeding Around The World in Under 5 minutes...

    John Ribeiro reports:

Wikimedia Foundation said on Monday that the Wikipedia community had chosen to black out..to protest against..SOPA in the U.S. House of Representatives, and..PIPA in the U.S. Senate.

..

Barack Obama's administration issued [this] statement on Saturday.."we will not support legislation that reduces freedom of expression, increases cybersecurity risk, or undermines the dynamic, innovative global Internet."

..

Yet..the Senate is still poised to bring PIPA to the floor next week, and SOPA proponents in the House are likely to try to revive the legislation.   
M0RE

    Aunty Beeb adds an international viewpoint:

The user-generated news site Reddit and the blog Boing Boing have also said they will take part. .. Twitter has declined to.

..

Wikipedia's founder, Jimmy Wales, told the BBC.."the bill is so over broad and so badly written that it's going to impact all kinds of things that..don't have anything to do with stopping piracy."

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Despite the hint of a presidential veto, Wikipedia said that [it] had decided to stage its..protest because the bills "would be devastating to the free and open web. .. Sopa and Pipa are just indicators of a much broader problem."

..

Sites..plan to go offline for 24 hours from midnight Eastern Standard Time (05:00 GMT) on Wednesday.  
M0RE

Wikimedia's Jay Walsh needs no citation:

If passed, this legislation will harm the free and open Internet and bring about..censorship of international websites.

..

The overwhelming majority..support community action..in response to these two bills. Of the proposals considered..those that would result in a "blackout" of the English Wikipedia..received the strongest support.

..

If you live in the United States, find your elected representative. .. If you live outside the United States, contact your..government. Tell them you..want the internet to remain open and free.   
M0RE

Meanwhile, Mathew Ingram deals with premature reports of SOPA's death:

Reports that the SOPA legislation had been shelved..led some to believe the law was effectively dead, but [others] have questioned that assumption. Among them is..Tim O’Reilly, who said..that reports of SOPA’s demise “are premature” and those protesting against the legislation should “keep up the fight.”   
M0RE

Update: Dan Tynan is suitably sarcastic:

SOPA and PIPA [are] two proposed laws we don’t really understand but know are bad because everyone we know says so.

..

[The] Internet is a living, breathing organism. It has a heart and a soul..fingers and toes and that thing that dangles from the roof of our mouths like a tiny little punching bag. .. If SOPA passes, the InterWebs as we know them would cease to exist.   
M0RE

   And Finally...
Speeding Around The World in Under 5 minutes Time Lapse
[hat tip: Mary House]

  
 
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Richi Jennings, your humble blogwatcher

Richi Jennings is an independent analyst/consultant, specializing in blogging, email, and security. He's the creator and main author of Computerworld's IT Blogwatch -- for which he has won American Society of Business Publication Editors and Jesse H. Neal awards on behalf of Computerworld. He also writes The Long View for IDG Enterprise. A cross-functional IT geek since 1985, you can follow him as @richi on Twitter, pretend to be richij's friend on Facebook, or just use good old email: itbw@richij.com. You can also read Richi's full profile and disclosure of his industry affiliations.

Copyright © 2012 IDG Communications, Inc.

  
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