How to save money in IT

IT pilot fish is working for a big paper maker in one of its plants when the order comes down for belts to be tightened -- and one of the people who is squeezed out is fish.

"Six months later, I get a call from my former company," he says. "They're having a problem with a new large printer for an automated label system and they need help."

Turns out the printer hasn't been working for three weeks and the IT staff has tried everything, including paying for an IBM tech to come to the plant to work on it.

Did you check my old office? fish asks. All the documentation is there. Not anymore -- it seems a sales guy cleaned out fish's old office and tossed everything.

Fish figures it will take a few days to get it all working again, so he quotes a price that will cover that time. It's approved instantly.

Next day he comes into the plant and goes to work on the printer. Three hours later, it's printing fine. He spends another hour testing and saying hello to his old friends, and the job is done.

"While the system was down for three weeks and a whole IT staff trying to fix it, the plant had to have a extra guy on overtime for every shift -- cost to the plant, $40,000 -- plus IT's time plus IBM charges and my charges," says fish.

"If they had kept me on staff they would have saved money.

"Anyone looking for a IT guy?"

Sharky's looking for your true tale of IT life. Send it to me at sharky@computerworld.com. You'll score a sharp Shark shirt if I use it. Add your comments below, and read some great old tales in the Sharkives.

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Copyright © 2010 IDG Communications, Inc.

  
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