And good luck with that

Pilot fish is hired by a business services company to add an IT services department -- and pretty much from the start there are some, um, communications issues.

"A few months after I was hired, our marketing VP hired a marketing agency to build a Web site," says fish. "I was never a part of the loop until three days after it went live, when the marketing VP and the owner of the marketing agency were in my office wanting to know why the Web site wasn't working.

"They didn't even offer the name of the hosting site, which told me loads of what they had no clue of."

Fish pings the domain name, then uses the IP address to find the local hosting site. Turns out their servers have been hijacked and they're in the middle of fixing the problem.

So fish reports back to the marketing VP, trying to explain how the chain of responsibility for a Web site works. But the marketing VP rudely shuts fish up -- and fish later learns that she also made disparaging remarks about him to the company president.

Flash forward almost a year: Fish gets a call from a company that monitors Web traffic, informing him that the Web site has been hijacked.

Fish still isn't in the official loop on the Web site, and this time he doesn't bother with contacting the marketing VP -- he calls a tech at the hosting site, who confirms that there's been a SQL injection attack that used a month-old exploit in software used for the Web site.

"It took three days for the marketing agency to update the software," grumbles fish. "But the Web site was down for a week and a half because the agency didn't have a current backup of the Web site.

"The marketing agency, its support company and the marketing VP tried to assign blame to our domain controller on my server, which had nothing at all to do with this site.

"The first incident soured the marketing VP on marketing our offering of IT services, and I'm now laid off because our projected revenues fell short.

"Now I'm working on a meeting with the company president to make a case for my department with 100% marketing effort -- and to shed light on what happened."

Communicate with Sharky. Send me your true tale of IT life at sharky@computerworld.com. You'll snag a snazzy Shark shirt if I use it. Add your comments below, and read some great old tales in the Sharkives.

Now you can post your own stories of IT ridiculousness at Shark Bait. Join today and vent your IT frustrations to people who've been there, done that.

Copyright © 2009 IDG Communications, Inc.

  
Shop Tech Products at Amazon