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News, trends, in-depth analysis and more about privacy and data privacy

Privacy News

Twitter to remove images of deceased upon request

Twitter said late Tuesday it will remove images and videos of deceased people upon the request of family members, but it put conditions on the policy.
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Healthcare organizations still too lax on security

The data breach at Community Health Systems that exposed the personal information on more than 4.5 million people is a symptom of the chronic lack of attention to patient data security and privacy within the healthcare industry.

Senator questions airlines' data privacy practices

A senior U.S. senator is asking airlines about their data privacy practices, saying he's concerned about what information the companies are collecting and sharing with third parties.

Dozens of U.S. tech firms violate EU privacy promises

Thirty U.S. data brokers and data management firms, including Adobe Systems, AOL and Salesforce.com, are violating privacy promises they've made regarding their handling of the personal information of EU residents, a privacy group said in a complaint to be filed Thursday.

Snowden reveals automated NSA cyberwarfare program

The U.S. National Security Agency has a cyberwarfare program that hunts for foreign cyberattacks and is able to strike back without human intervention, according to NSA leaker Edward Snowden.

Messenger app users worry how Facebook uses a device's phone, camera

Facebook ignited a flood of criticism last week when it began requiring mobile users to load its Messenger app for Android and iOS separate from its basic Facebook app.

Senator wants curbs placed on fitness data use

Sen. Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) wants the U.S. Federal Trade Commission to investigate the data gathering and sharing practices of makers of personal fitness devices and applications.

U.S. court rules in favor of providing officials access to entire email account

A federal Judge Friday ruled that providing law enforcement with access to an entire email account in an investigation did not violate the Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution that prohibits unreasonable searches and seizures of property.

Austrian court rejects 'class action' privacy suit filed against Facebook

A 'class action' suit against Facebook over its privacy policies was rejected by the commercial court of Vienna, and referred to the regional court in the same city, a commercial court spokesman said Friday.

Snowden allowed to stay in Russia for three more years

The Russian government will allow Edward Snowden, the former U.S. National Security Agency contractor who leaked details of the agency's worldwide surveillance programs, to stay in the country for three more years, according to Russia news reports.

Privacy In Depth

The trouble with trolls (and how to beat them)

A vulnerable person. A sociopath or two on social media tormenting that person without consequence. That's trolling in a nutshell. Mike Elgan explains what you can do about it.

Alex Burinskiy: OkCupid -- it's not me, it's you

So OKCupid has rushed to Facebook's defense by announcing that it, too, experiments on users' profiles. Is this any way to run a social site?

Why your online identity can never really be erased

One seemingly unshakeable truth about the online world since it began is this: The Internet never forgets. Once you post anything online, it is recoverable forever -- the claims of former IRS official Lois Lerner about "lost" emails notwithstanding. Even promises of photos disappearing after a few seconds have been shown to be bogus.

In search of a social site that doesn't lie

Mike Elgan would like to find a social network that doesn't lie to users, doesn't experiment on users without their clear knowledge, and delivers by default all the posts of the people they follow.

Wearables: Are we handing more tools to Big Brother?

Most of us would love a break on our health insurance. We would generally appreciate the convenience of seeing ads for things we're actually interested in buying, instead of irrelevant "clutter." A lot of us would like someone, or something, else keeping track of how effective our workouts are.

Facebook is a school yard bully that's going down

Facebook has grown and evolved in recent years. In addition to connecting people online, it bombards users with unnecessary ads and useless sponsored stories. And it runs experiments on its users. Columnist Alex Burinskiy is not amused.

Ron Miller: A curmudgeonly view of Yo

Yo is a flash in the pan of an app that lets you say 'Yo' to your followers. That's it. Is it curmudgeonly to wonder how that could draw $1.2 million in funding?

Why you shouldn't buy the Amazon Fire phone

Amazon and its Fire phone are capable of the most comprehensive and aggressive personal data harvesting ever offered in any product. The company needs to be far more transparent about what the phone actually does, and how Amazon protects all this data.

Malvertising rise pushes ad industry to action

With hidden malware on the rise, the online advertising industry may finally have to get its governance act together.

Tails 1.0: A bootable Linux distro that protects your privacy

Whatever your primary OS, Linux distro Tails 1.0 offers a plethora of security features to help you work online without worrying about privacy issues.

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