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Twitter to remove images of deceased upon request

Twitter said late Tuesday it will remove images and videos of deceased people upon the request of family members, but it put conditions on the policy.

Healthcare organizations still too lax on security

The data breach at Community Health Systems that exposed the personal information on more than 4.5 million people is a symptom of the chronic lack of attention to patient data security and privacy within the healthcare industry.

Senator questions airlines' data privacy practices

A senior U.S. senator is asking airlines about their data privacy practices, saying he's concerned about what information the companies are collecting and sharing with third parties.

Dozens of U.S. tech firms violate EU privacy promises

Thirty U.S. data brokers and data management firms, including Adobe Systems, AOL and Salesforce.com, are violating privacy promises they've made regarding their handling of the personal information of EU residents, a privacy group said in a complaint to be filed Thursday.

Snowden reveals automated NSA cyberwarfare program

The U.S. National Security Agency has a cyberwarfare program that hunts for foreign cyberattacks and is able to strike back without human intervention, according to NSA leaker Edward Snowden.

Messenger app users worry how Facebook uses a device's phone, camera

Facebook ignited a flood of criticism last week when it began requiring mobile users to load its Messenger app for Android and iOS separate from its basic Facebook app.

Senator wants curbs placed on fitness data use

Sen. Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) wants the U.S. Federal Trade Commission to investigate the data gathering and sharing practices of makers of personal fitness devices and applications.

U.S. court rules in favor of providing officials access to entire email account

A federal Judge Friday ruled that providing law enforcement with access to an entire email account in an investigation did not violate the Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution that prohibits unreasonable searches and seizures of property.

Austrian court rejects 'class action' privacy suit filed against Facebook

A 'class action' suit against Facebook over its privacy policies was rejected by the commercial court of Vienna, and referred to the regional court in the same city, a commercial court spokesman said Friday.

Snowden allowed to stay in Russia for three more years

The Russian government will allow Edward Snowden, the former U.S. National Security Agency contractor who leaked details of the agency's worldwide surveillance programs, to stay in the country for three more years, according to Russia news reports.

Could drones get X-ray vision through Wi-Fi?

Researchers have developed mobile robots that can use Wi-Fi signals to effectively "see through" walls. It's raising the possibility of flying drones using the technology to see inside buildings.

As Facebook privacy suit reaches 25,000 participant target, court is unsure if it will allow it

An Austrian 'class action' lawsuit against Facebook over the company's privacy policies is expected to reach a limit of 25,000 participants on Wednesday. It remains however uncertain if the commercial court in Vienna will accept the case.

Microsoft ordered to turn over customer data stored in the cloud

Microsoft has been ordered to comply with a U.S. government demand for a customer's emails stored on a company server in Dublin, Ireland.

Some are twisting the facts in requests to be forgotten, Google says

Some of those seeking to scrub their histories from the Web under Europe's "right to be forgotten" rule are being economical with the truth when making their requests, Google said Thursday.

The CIA improperly accessed Senate computers

An internal CIA investigation has determined its employees improperly accessed computers used by the Senate Intelligence Committee while it was working on a report about the agency's post-9/11 detention and interrogation program, according to a report by McClatchy.

In a hyper-social world, some seek a little privacy

After years of cajoling their users into sharing every thought, emotion and selfie, online firms are seeing that providing more private online spaces might also be profitable.

Senator pushes new version of bill to limit NSA phone records collection

U.S. Senator Patrick Leahy has introduced a new version of a bill to rein in the National Security Agency's bulk collection of U.S. phone records in an effort to strengthen legislation that passed the House of Representatives this year.

Privacy groups call for Facebook to halt off site user tracking plans

U.S. and EU privacy and consumer groups called on privacy regulators to stop Facebook's plans to gather the Internet browsing patterns of its users while they visit other sites.

Russian gov't is willing to pay for a way to ID Tor users

The Russian Ministry of Interior is willing to pay 3.9 million roubles, or around $111,000, for a method to identify users on the Tor network.

EU hears Google, Microsoft, Yahoo on 'right to be forgotten'

Google, Microsoft and Yahoo are meeting with European data protection authorities Thursday to discuss how to implement a recent ruling that gives people the right to have personal information excluded from search results.

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