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More Government IT News

Court rejects Lavabit appeal, cites improper procedural handling

A federal court has affirmed contempt charges against Lavabit, rejecting an attempt by company attorneys to argue new issues on appeal.

NSA denies it knew about Heartbleed flaw

The U.S. National Security Agency, which has a cybersecurity mission in addition to surveillance, has disputed a report that it knew about the Heartbleed security vulnerability for at least two years before other researchers disclosed the flaw this month.

Wi-Fi problems dog Apple-Samsung trial

There's a new sign on the door to Courtroom 5 at the federal courthouse in San Jose, the home to the Apple v. Samsung battle that's playing out this month: "Please turn off all cell phones."

Feds are OK with cyberthreat info sharing, say it's not an antitrust violation

U.S. businesses can share most cyberthreat information with competitors without facing antitrust enforcement action, two U.S. enforcement agencies said Thursday.

Canada halts online tax returns in wake of Heartbleed

Canada Revenue Agency has halted online filing of tax returns by the country's citizens following the disclosure of the Heartbleed security vulnerability that rocked the Internet this week.

TWC-Comcast deal could mean higher broadband prices

The proposed $45.2 billion acquisition of Time Warner Cable by Comcast would give the company huge market power to determine broadband prices and Internet content, a group of U.S. senators said Wednesday.

Supreme Court takes a pass on NSA surveillance case

The U.S. Supreme Court has declined to hear a lawsuit challenging the U.S. National Security Agency's collection of U.S. phone records filed by a conservative activist, despite a lower court's ruling that the program may be illegal.

State AGs probe Experian subsidiary's data breach

A group of state attorneys general in the U.S. is launching an investigation into a recently disclosed data breach of 200 million personal records at a subsidiary of credit monitoring firm Experian.

NSA phone metadata collection program renewed for 90 days

The Obama Administration has secured a 90-day extension of the National Security Agency's controversial authority to collect phone metadata records on U.S. customers under the Patriot Act.

Supreme Court justices raise questions about software patents

The U.S. Supreme Court could wipe out a whole swath of software and business-method patents if justices invalidate four electronic-trading patents, an attorney for patent-owner Alice said.

Healthcare.gov sees a maintenance outage on sign-up deadline day

The U.S. government's flagship health insurance exchange website, Healthcare.gov, was temporarily shut down Monday, the deadline for people to sign up for health coverage under the new law.

China calls US spying actions 'hypocrisy,' plans to beef up security

China's Ministry of National Defense blasted the U.S. over recent allegations that it spied on Huawei Technologies, and said it plans to shore up the nation's Internet security in response.

Petitions call on US government to leave Snowden alone

U.S. President Barack Obama's administration should reverse its decision to suspend the passport of U.S. National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden and end its efforts to prosecute him as policymakers push to change the programs he exposed, a group of activists said.

Obama eyes legislation to end NSA bulk phone data collection

The Obama administration is set to propose legislation that will end the bulk collection of phone data by the National Security Agency, according to a newspaper report.

Report rips state officials, Oracle over Oregon's troubled healthcare site

A newly released, independent audit of Oregon's disastrous Obamacare website implementation takes both state officials and site contractor Oracle to task, saying each side contributed to problems that have generated a political firestorm in recent months.

Turkey blocks access to Twitter over content

Twitter offered workarounds to Turkish users on Thursday following reports by users that the service was facing interruptions and possibly a block in the country.

Does Dorian Satoshi Nakamoto have a case against Newsweek?

This week's emphatic denial from Dorian Satoshi Nakamoto that he had anything to do with the creation of Bitcoin also hinted at a possible lawsuit against Newsweek, though legal experts say it would be an uphill battle.

U.S. officials say NSA surveillance overseas is targeted, not bulk collection

A U.S. National Security Agency surveillance program focused on overseas telephone and email communications is targeted and narrow, and not the bulk collection portrayed in numerous news reports from recent months, U.S. officials told a privacy watchdog board Wednesday.

U.S. government to end formal relationship with ICANN in '15

The U.S. National Telecommunications and Information Administration will end its formal relationship with the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers in late 2015, with ICANN developing a new global governance model, the agency said Friday.

California police criticized for 'stingray' cellphone trackers

Law enforcement agencies in California are using devices that mimic cellular base stations to track mobile users, public records have revealed, triggering charges that the practice may be unconstitutional.