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More Government IT News

LTE network for US public safety taking it one step at a time

The organizers of the FirstNet LTE public safety network have the frequencies and standards they need to build the system, and they know where the money's coming from. They know how to get there from here, but it won't be a quick trip.

Russian gov't is willing to pay for a way to ID Tor users

The Russian Ministry of Interior is willing to pay 3.9 million roubles, or around $111,000, for a method to identify users on the Tor network.

State Dept. database crash leads to passport, visa delays

A State Department database crash has delayed the issuing of passports and visas worldwide.

California sees IT shifting to IBM-built cloud

California is moving its IT services to a cloud, on-demand, subscription-based service that state officials believe may meet as much as 80% of its computing needs.

Social Security Administration spent $300M on IT project 'boondoggle,' lawmakers say

The Social Security Administration has spent nearly US$300 million on a software system for processing disability claims that still isn't finished and has delivered limited useful functionality, according to an independent report on the project.

Google rival slams EU Commission over antitrust settlement proposals

One of the complainants in an antitrust case against Google has slammed the European Commission for apparently adopting wholesale Google's proposal to settle the case, while giving complainants no fair chance to express their views on the settlement. Meanwhile, the Commission is considering revising the terms of the settlement, according to media reports.

Google may bring Wi-Fi to New York City pay phones

Google may be among the hopefuls vying to turn the New York City phone booths of the past into "communication points" of the future with free Wi-Fi and cellphone charging.

US needs to restore trust following NSA revelations, tech groups say

The U.S government can take action to slow the calls in other countries to abandon U.S. tech vendors following revelations about widespread National Security Agency surveillance, some tech representatives said Friday.

Overreliance on the NSA led to weak crypto standard, NIST advisers find

The National Institute of Standards and Technology needs to hire more cryptographers and improve its collaboration with the industry and academia, reducing its reliance on the U.S. National Security Agency for decisions around cryptographic standards.

Germany asks US intelligence chief in country to leave over spying affair

The top American intelligence officer in Germany has been asked to leave the country in the wake of revelations about National Security Agency spying and two recent cases in which the U.S. reportedly recruited German spies.

IBM project aims to forecast and control Beijing's air pollution

China's nagging pollution problems could start to abate with the help of an IBM project that seeks to predict and control the air quality in Beijing, using new computing technologies.

Secret code indicates NSA tracks privacy tool users

A NSA spying tool is configured to snoop on an array of privacy programs used by journalists and dissidents, according to an analysis of never-before-seen code leaked by an unknown source.

Microsoft admits technical error in IP takeover, but No-IP still down

Microsoft admitted Tuesday it made a technical error after it commandeered part of an Internet service's network in order to shut down a botnet, but the Nevada-based company says its services are still down.

FBI, CIA can query US communications collected by NSA

The FBI and CIA can query the content of U.S. residents' electronic communications that the National Security Agency inadvertently collects when targeting foreign terrorism suspects, an intelligence official said.

Senators question US surveillance transparency report

A recent report from the U.S. intelligence director that provides the number of surveillance targets in 2013 is not specific enough to provide the transparency the nation's residents need, two senators said.

German government to drop Verizon because of US spying

The German government is dropping Verizon Communications as a service provider because of worries about U.S. spying.

Warrants needed for cellphone searches, Supreme Court rules

Police cannot generally search cellphones without a warrant when they are arresting someone, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in a unanimous decision Wednesday that weighs heavily in favor of Fourth Amendment and privacy rights.

Warrants needed for cellphone searches, Supreme Court rules

Police must obtain warrants to search cellphones and smartphones when they are making arrests, the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled in a unanimous decision.

Facial recognition proposal lacks privacy protections, advocate says

A facial recognition trade group's proposals for privacy standards are an "extreme" departure from U.S. expectations on how personal data should be handled, a privacy advocate said Tuesday.

Hadoop analysis now tackling IoT to improve transit

For the Internet of Things, collecting data is only half the battle, and public transit agencies know that as well as anyone.