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More Government IT News

IT outages are an ongoing problem for the U.S government

Fully 70% of federal agencies experienced downtime of 30 minutes or more in a recent one-month period.

FCC extends net neutrality comment period to Sept. 15

The U.S. Federal Communications Commission has extended a deadline for comments on its proposed net neutrality rules to Sept. 15, giving members of the public more time to weigh in on how the government should regulate Web traffic.

Wyoming to close data centers in cloud shift

The state of Wyoming is planning to discontinue most of its data center operations and move its physical equipment to commercial colocation facilities.

Snowden reveals automated NSA cyberwarfare program

The U.S. National Security Agency has a cyberwarfare program that hunts for foreign cyberattacks and is able to strike back without human intervention, according to NSA leaker Edward Snowden.

White House's new IT engineer is sharp, witty, and blunt

If the White House learned one thing from the Healthcare.gov debacle, it was that the government needs clear-thinking people who can see a problem for what it is. Mikey Dickerson may just be that person.

US consumer agency warns of several Bitcoin risks

Bitcoin and other virtual currencies can expose users to a number of risks, including hackers and scammers trying to take advantage of hype surrounding the technology, a U.S. consumer protection agency warned Monday.

Federal CIOs lean on virtualization, shared services to trim data centers

Viewing the data center as the focal point of an ambitious set of technology initiatives, federal CIOs are working aggressively to slash server counts and consolidate facilities as they position their agencies to adopt cloud applications, roll out mobile technologies and support big data projects.

Veteran Affairs overhaul includes IT assessment

President Obama has signed legislation focused on overhauling the Department of Veteran Affairs' troubled health-care system, including an IT review of the VA's process of scheduling patients.

Snowden allowed to stay in Russia for three more years

The Russian government will allow Edward Snowden, the former U.S. National Security Agency contractor who leaked details of the agency's worldwide surveillance programs, to stay in the country for three more years, according to Russia news reports.

HP to pay $32.5M to settle allegations it overbilled U.S. Postal Service

Hewlett-Packard has agreed to pay US$32.5 million to settle allegations that it overbilled the U.S. Postal Service on a IT hardware contract.

Almost 200,000 people may have been affected by US visa system crash

Computer problems with the U.S. State Department's system for issuing passports and visas may have affected up to 200,000 people, it emerged Thursday, as the scale of the problem became clear for the first time.

Oracle-based U.S. visa system still glitchy despite software update

There's no immediate end in sight to trouble that has hit the U.S. State Department's computer system for processing visa applications and caused problems for thousands of people worldwide.

Congress okays upgrade of VA's 29-year-old software

An agreement in Congress to allocate $17 billion to the Department of Veterans Affairs includes money for a major tech upgrade.

LTE network for US public safety taking it one step at a time

The organizers of the FirstNet LTE public safety network have the frequencies and standards they need to build the system, and they know where the money's coming from. They know how to get there from here, but it won't be a quick trip.

Russian gov't is willing to pay for a way to ID Tor users

The Russian Ministry of Interior is willing to pay 3.9 million roubles, or around $111,000, for a method to identify users on the Tor network.

State Dept. database crash leads to passport, visa delays

A State Department database crash has delayed the issuing of passports and visas worldwide.

California sees IT shifting to IBM-built cloud

California is moving its IT services to a cloud, on-demand, subscription-based service that state officials believe may meet as much as 80% of its computing needs.

Social Security Administration spent $300M on IT project 'boondoggle,' lawmakers say

The Social Security Administration has spent nearly US$300 million on a software system for processing disability claims that still isn't finished and has delivered limited useful functionality, according to an independent report on the project.

Google rival slams EU Commission over antitrust settlement proposals

One of the complainants in an antitrust case against Google has slammed the European Commission for apparently adopting wholesale Google's proposal to settle the case, while giving complainants no fair chance to express their views on the settlement. Meanwhile, the Commission is considering revising the terms of the settlement, according to media reports.

Google may bring Wi-Fi to New York City pay phones

Google may be among the hopefuls vying to turn the New York City phone booths of the past into "communication points" of the future with free Wi-Fi and cellphone charging.