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Cybercrime and Hacking Topic Center

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Cybercrime and Hacking News

Retired US airport body scanners fail to spot guns, knives

A type of body scanner in wide use across U.S. airports through last year fails to spot well-concealed weapons including guns and knives, computer security researchers contend.
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UPS now the third company in a week to disclose data breach

Credit and debit card information belonging to customers who did business at 51 UPS Store Inc. locations in 24 U.S. states this year may have been compromised.

'Reveton'ransomware adds powerful password stealer

A type of malware called Reveton, which falsely warns users they've broken the law and demands payment of a fine, has been upgraded with powerful password stealing functions, according to Avast.

Why would Chinese hackers want US hospital patient data?

The theft of personal data on 4.5 million patients of Community Health Systems by hackers in China highlights the increasing degree to which hospitals are becoming lucrative targets for information theft.

About 4.5M face risk of ID theft after hospital network hacked

About 4.5 million people in 28 states face the risk of identity theft due to a massive data breach at Community Health Systems (CHS) a Franklin, Tenn., based health network.

Chinese man indicted over theft of Boeing C-17 secrets

A Chinese man has been indicted for allegedly directing two China-based hackers to infiltrate Boeing and other defense contractors to steal gigabytes of documents describing U.S. military aircraft.

Supervalu breach shows why move to smartcards is long overdue

The data breach disclosed by Supervalu is another reminder about why the ongoing migration of the U.S. payment system to smartcard technology can't happen fast enough.

Grocery stores in multiple states hit by data breach

A data breach at Supervalu Inc., one of the largest grocery wholesalers and retailers in the U.S., could affect thousands of people who shopped at the company's stores in June and July.

Ferguson's tiny IT operation in the maelstrom

Ferguson, Mo., the city now in the midst of protests over a fatal police shooting, runs the type of IT department that gets almost no attention.

Tennessee firm blames bank for $193K cybertheft

A lawsuit filed in Tennessee earlier this month has resurfaced questions about a bank's responsibility in protecting customers against cyberheists.

Cybercrime and Hacking In Depth

Kicking the stool out from under the cybercrime economy

Put simply, cybercrime, especially financial malware, has the potential to be quite the lucrative affair. That's only because the bad guys have the tools to make their work quick and easy, though. Cripple the automated processes presented by certain malware platforms, and suddenly the threats -- and the losses --aren't quite so serious.

The making of a cybercrime market

I recently had the opportunity to speak with two representatives from the Netherlands-based security research firm Fox-IT--Maurits Lucas, InTELL Business Director, and Andy Chandler, VP of WW Sales & Marketing. Collectively, the two shared an in-depth story of cybergang warfare suitable for Hollywood.

How to protect yourself against privileged user abuse

The typical organization loses 5% of its revenues to fraud by its own employees each year, with most thefts committed by trusted employees in executive management, operations, accounting, sales, customer service or purchasing, according to the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (ACFE). This type of malicious behavior by "privileged users" who have been given broad access to the company's computer assets has captured the attention of CIOs across the country.

Six ways to prevent a breach like the one at AT&T

A data breach like the one recently reported by AT&T demonstrates that security policies alone are only a paper tiger without the technological teeth to make sure they are enforced, experts say.

'Oleg Pliss' hack makes for a perfect teachable IT moment

Earlier this week, some iOS device owners woke up to discover that "Oleg Pliss" had hacked their iPhones and iPads and locked them up. The hack could have been worse, says Ryan Fass, which is why it's a good lesson in security that IT staffers should use.

U.S. set to charge Chinese military officials with hacking

The U.S. Department of Justice is preparing to charge Chinese military officials with hacking US companies to obtain trade secrets.

Evan Schuman: Killer robots? What could go wrong? Oh, yeah ...

The UN wants to talk about killer robots as 'conventional weapons.' Someone needs to learn the IT facts of life: If something can go wrong, it will.

Ira Winkler: My run-in with the Syrian Electronic Army

The hacker group dedicated to supporting Syria's dictator wasted an attack vector on trying to embarrass the writer. Will the SEA's handlers in the Syrian intelligence services approve of such immaturity?

CIO Discovers the 'Terrifying' Reality of Cloud Apps Running Wild

Rogue cloud services are ripping gaping holes in the security fabric of most companies, putting the CIO in a tough spot. But as the fallout from the Target attack shows, IT and business leaders will go down together if the breach hits the fan.

Evan Schuman: Resurrection of Full Disclosure mailing list is great news, if you're not a cyberthief

The alternatives to an independent list like Full Disclosure can't match it for stopping new cyberattack tactics.