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More Security In Depth

Kicking the stool out from under the cybercrime economy

Put simply, cybercrime, especially financial malware, has the potential to be quite the lucrative affair. That's only because the bad guys have the tools to make their work quick and easy, though. Cripple the automated processes presented by certain malware platforms, and suddenly the threats -- and the losses --aren't quite so serious.

SDS still young, but very much on the rise

Anything "software-defined"--networks, storage, data centers--is grabbing a lot of attention these days. Security is no exception. Software-defined security (SDS) is an emerging model in which information security is deployed, controlled and managed by software.

The trouble with trolls (and how to beat them)

A vulnerable person. A sociopath or two on social media tormenting that person without consequence. That's trolling in a nutshell. Mike Elgan explains what you can do about it.

4 Small Business Security Lessons From Real-Life Hacks

It's no longer unusual to see major, massive hacks make news these days. They affect millions of individuals and cost millions of dollars to rectify.

The making of a cybercrime market

I recently had the opportunity to speak with two representatives from the Netherlands-based security research firm Fox-IT--Maurits Lucas, InTELL Business Director, and Andy Chandler, VP of WW Sales & Marketing. Collectively, the two shared an in-depth story of cybergang warfare suitable for Hollywood.

State-of-the-art spear phishing and defenses

The number of phishing sites was up 10.7-percent as of Q1 this year (over last year) while at the same time almost 32.7-percent of PCs globally were infected with malware, including adware and spyware, indicating that phishing is an increasing issue for the enterprise, according to a report from the Anti-Phishing Working Group of the Internet Engineering Task Force.

Security Manager's Journal: Peering behind the firewall

The corporate firewall is like a dike keeping out a raging sea of malware. Where does it all come from?

Where your personal data goes when you're not looking

As businesses integrate vast quantities of new consumer data they need to think through privacy and transparency issues.

Alex Burinskiy: OkCupid -- it's not me, it's you

So OKCupid has rushed to Facebook's defense by announcing that it, too, experiments on users' profiles. Is this any way to run a social site?

Why your online identity can never really be erased

One seemingly unshakeable truth about the online world since it began is this: The Internet never forgets. Once you post anything online, it is recoverable forever -- the claims of former IRS official Lois Lerner about "lost" emails notwithstanding. Even promises of photos disappearing after a few seconds have been shown to be bogus.

In search of a social site that doesn't lie

Mike Elgan would like to find a social network that doesn't lie to users, doesn't experiment on users without their clear knowledge, and delivers by default all the posts of the people they follow.

Security Manager's Journal: A ransomware flop, thanks to security awareness

Only one person clicks on a bad link, and she had all her files properly backed up. Maybe employees aren't a security manager's nightmare after all.

Mobile management: Making sense of your options

There are known, proven approaches to reduce those risks without disabling the benefit of consumerization

How to Protect Personal, Corporate Information When You Travel

Before flying from Rome to Philadelphia earlier this summer, I stopped in the hotel lobby to print my boarding pass. The hotel had one computer dedicated solely to this task. It was the only public computer available to guests. I could access only airline websites and input my name and confirmation number for the ticket. That was it.

Virtual servers still face real security threats

Don't let the word "virtual" in virtual servers fool you. You're the only one who knows it's virtual. From the perspective of the virtual server itself, the devices connected to it, applications running on it, end-users connecting to it, or security threats trying to compromise it, the server is very, very real. A new survey from Kaspersky Labs found that many IT professionals understand that securing virtual environments is important, but don't fully understand the threats or how to properly defend against them.

Mobile security: A mother lode of new tools

A gold rush of next-gen authentication technologies yields biometric systems, ID bracelets, new standards and more. Insider (registration required)

11 signs you've been hacked -- and how to fight back

Redirected Net searches, unexpected installs, rogue mouse pointers: Here's what to do when you've been 0wned

BYOD morphs from lockdown to true mobility

Four companies that have been at BYOD for a while talk about how their programs have changed with the times. One key takeaway: Don't expect to save bundles of money. Insider (registration required)

No money, no problem: Building a security awareness program on a shoestring budget

Implementing a security awareness program seems rather straightforward, until you actually start to implement one - factoring in things like resources and the people (users) to be trained. At that point, it can seem complicated, costly, and unnecessary. However, the process doesn't have to be a logistical and expensive nightmare, and it's certainly worth it in the long run.

Developing a smart approach to SMAC security

Few security executives at global enterprises--or even at smaller organizations--have not had to deal with issues related to social media, mobile technology, big data/analytics, or cloud computing.

Kenneth van Wyk: We can't just blame users

Yes, users sometimes do stupid things. Some always will. But developers need to do more to save users from themselves.

Boost your security training with gamification -- really!

Getting employees to take security seriously can be a game that everyone wins.

Wearables: Are we handing more tools to Big Brother?

Most of us would love a break on our health insurance. We would generally appreciate the convenience of seeing ads for things we're actually interested in buying, instead of irrelevant "clutter." A lot of us would like someone, or something, else keeping track of how effective our workouts are.

Revamping your insider threat program

Companies including MITRE are looking at privileged access and how to better lock it down -- without stopping employees from doing their jobs.

Security Manager's Journal: Trapped: Building access controls go kablooey

Doors just stop working when one old PC in a storage closet dies.

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