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More Cloud Computing In Depth

Cloud BI: Going where the data lives

Historically, cloud BI has been mostly used by smaller businesses, but larger enterprises are starting to make the trek.

What failure looks like in Microsoft's cloud-first world

Continuous delivery, company-wide hackathons, growth hacking, features driven by user feedback through sites like user voice: The new face of Microsoft is all about moving faster and being more responsive. Moving faster can also mean things breaking. But failure, and what you do when things go wrong, look rather different in a cloud-first mobile-first world.

Review: Birst brings DIY to BI

With straightforward data access, automated modeling, and easy reporting tools, cloud-based Birst Enterprise is the data warehouse for the rest of us

PaaS shoot-out: Cloud Foundry vs. OpenShift

Cloud Foundry shines with broad application support and stellar ease of use, but OpenShift has the edge in management and automation

Is Amazon Web Services Really Down and Out?

Two weeks ago, Amazon announced its quarterly earnings, reporting a much larger net loss than expected. There was much speculation by pundits about the reasons for the scale of the loss (including me in a CNBC segment). Many commentators placed responsibility for size of the loss on Amazon Web Services -- after AWS responded to an approximately 30 percent price cut by Google, the size of the "other" AWS category, in which Amazon places AWS revenues, fell 3 percent from the previous quarter.

How to Survive 4 Cloud Horror Stories

Horror stories don't just happen at the movie theater. In a few cases, companies make a big play to use the wrong cloud application or experience widespread outages in their connection to cloud storage.

Build your own private cloud

Borrowing from public cloud architecture and technologies, the private cloud weaves a new management layer around virtualized data center systems

Microsoft Office 365 vs. Google Apps: The ultimate guide

Download this handy PDF to learn all the ins and outs of the two major cloud productivity suites and decide which option is best for you

We Are All Plank-Owners now

In August 2012, SAIC, the $11B national security, engineering, and enterprise IT provider, announced that it would split in two: SAIC would deliver enterprise IT services to the government sector, and a new company, Leidos, would provide services in security, health and engineering.

NetApp sets its sights on cloud data management: A Q&A with CEO Tom Georgens

Moving virtual servers around a hybrid cloud environment isn't hard, but managing the data is. That's why NetApp wants to be "the enterprise data-management standard across the enterprise," says CEO Tom Georgens. Network World Editor in Chief John Dix recently caught up with Georgens to get his take on what changes in the cloud computing world.

The Uneven Future: 2 Telling Views of Cloud Adoption

My last couple of columns have addressed cloud adoption patterns by IT organizations. Has Cloud Computing Been A Failed Revolution discussed the seeming ennui regarding cloud computing on the part of IT groups a that they seem less interested in the field, despite the belief on the part of vendors that the cloud represents tomorrow's technology infrastructure. Most recently, The Real Cloud Computing Revolution described three real-world examples of companies using cloud computing to solve problems they couldn't have addressed in the infrastructure models of traditional IT.

Quick guide: 25 tips and tricks for Google Drive power users

Google Drive is an important tool that can deliver even more value with these 25 tips, tools, and tweaks

Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols: Who should really worry about Apple/IBM? Microsoft

Sure, the enterprise push by Apple and IBM should worry the Android camp, and business writers should make sure they have an up-to-date obituary ready for BlackBerry. But Microsoft is the company with the most to lose.

How to Set Up a New Business Using Only Cloud Services

As recently as five years ago, setting up a new business and equipping it for a PC-literate workforce was a costly affair. You needed to acquire server hardware and pay various software licensing fees.

Review: Cloud Foundry brings power and polish to PaaS

Cloud Foundry impresses with broad application support, streamlined deployment, and enterprise extras from Pivotal, though initial setup could be simpler

Why a Media Giant Sold Its Data Center and Headed to the Cloud

Two weeks ago, venerable media company CondA(c) Nast -- publisher of magazines like Vogue, The New Yorker and Wired -- decommissioned its Newark, Del. data center. The 67,200 square feet facility had already been sold and the deal closed. The 105-year-old company had gone all-in with the cloud.

Why That Zero-feature Cloud Software Release Doesn't Cost Zero Dollars

When it comes to budgeting for cloud software, it's important to have some solid data about the cost of deploying a "zero-feature" update, the likelihood of encountering latent bugs, and the level of effort required for simple developer overhead and housekeeping. While there's some good data and solid advice out there from the Standish Group, as I mentioned in a recent article, I haven't seen any data that's particularly modern or really focused on the harsh realities of cloud software development.

Evan Schuman: What if you can't trust your inbox?

Goldman Sachs is taking Google to court to force the cloud vendor to delete an email accidentally sent to a Gmail user. The consequences of a ruling for Goldman would be devastating.

Microsoft Azure ML -- big data modeling in Azure

Microsoft has jumped in with both feet with the release to Preview of a new Microsoft Azure-based tool that helps organizations do Machine Learning and predictive analysis all from a Web console.

Uncovering the Virtues of Virtual Desktops

Can you name a single activity that consumes more IT staff time and presents more potential exposure to enterprise security risks than maintaining desktop and laptop computers across the enterprise? Despite the widespread use of remote desktop management tools, administrators must periodically descend upon offices and cubicles to upgrade or troubleshoot PCs.