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Legal News

Senator questions airlines' data privacy practices

A senior U.S. senator is asking airlines about their data privacy practices, saying he's concerned about what information the companies are collecting and sharing with third parties.
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Calif. court calls for company reimbursements for BYOD phones

In what could be a decisive blow to the Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) mega trend, the California Court of Appeal ruled late last week that companies must reimburse employees for work-related use of personal cellphones, as described in the National Law Review.

Rimini Street downplays impact of adverse ruling in Oracle lawsuit

Rimini Street has put on a brave face following a federal judge's determination that it stole Oracle's intellectual property in the course of providing software support to its customers.

Liberty Reserve official pleads guilty to money laundering

An official with Liberty Reserve, a popular digital currency service that was based in Costa Rica, has pleaded guilty to money laundering and operating an unlicensed money transmitting business.

Snowden reveals automated NSA cyberwarfare program

The U.S. National Security Agency has a cyberwarfare program that hunts for foreign cyberattacks and is able to strike back without human intervention, according to NSA leaker Edward Snowden.

Users told to patch critical flaw in Adobe Reader and Acrobat

Adobe Systems has released security patches for its Flash Player, Reader and Acrobat products, addressing a total of eight vulnerabilities, including one that is being exploited by attackers.

U.S. asks court to vacate stay in Microsoft email privacy case

The U.S. Department of Justice has asked a New York court to vacate a stay on an order that would require Microsoft to turn over to the government certain emails held abroad.

Accused Obamacare spammer settles FTC charges, will pay $350K

A company accused of sending unsolicited and deceptive email before the roll out of the U.S. Affordable Care Act will pay US$350,000 to settle a complaint from the U.S. Federal Trade Commission.

Windows tech support scammers take root in the U.S.

In a new trend, Windows tech support scams have gone home-grown, with twists that include bogus warnings from malicious websites urging users to call a toll-free number for "help."

Oracle slaps Oregon with a lawsuit over troubled Obamacare website

Oracle has sued Oregon for breach of contract, seeking more than US$20 million in fees the state is withholding for its work on Cover Oregon, a troubled insurance exchange website developed as part of President Barack Obama's health care policy overhaul.

Legal In Depth

Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols: Patent trolls under attack, but not dead yet

The patent wars keep going and going and we keep paying and paying.

How to Read (and Actually Understand) a Wearable Tech Privacy Policy

When was the last time you read a privacy policy? Any kind of privacy policy? Be honest.

Wearable Tech and Fitness Tracker Privacy Policies: Who Reads 'Em? (Poll)

I've been thinking a lot lately about wearable technology and how the true value of many of today's wearables lies in data collection and the subsequent analysis and correlation of that information. The idea couldn't have been clearer at last month's Wearable Tech Expo in New York City, where Pebble's Chief Product Evangelist, Myriam Joire told attendees of her keynote address:

Why your online identity can never really be erased

One seemingly unshakeable truth about the online world since it began is this: The Internet never forgets. Once you post anything online, it is recoverable forever -- the claims of former IRS official Lois Lerner about "lost" emails notwithstanding. Even promises of photos disappearing after a few seconds have been shown to be bogus.

Wearables: Are we handing more tools to Big Brother?

Most of us would love a break on our health insurance. We would generally appreciate the convenience of seeing ads for things we're actually interested in buying, instead of irrelevant "clutter." A lot of us would like someone, or something, else keeping track of how effective our workouts are.

Evan Schuman: Supreme Court on obvious patents: Common sense isn't so horrible

Unanimous decision won't shut down patent trolls, but it will curb worst abuses.

Why facial recognition isn't the way of the future...yet

It's the how the future is meant to be, isn't it? The good guys need to find a bad guy in a crowd of people, so they start scanning the environment with a camera that is equipped with facial recognition technology. Seconds later, they scan a face that's a positive match with an entry in their criminal database and bam, they've smoked him out.

How to create awareness of the insider threat

One of the legacies of Edward Snowden's treason is that companies are now concerned about the insider threat more than they ever were before. He demonstrates that a single person inside an organization can devastate the organization. While technology should have caught Snowden, there is also the realization that his coworkers and managers should have noticed indications of unusual activities.

Trust issue looms large for tech companies capitalizing on personal data

As tech companies increasingly rely on analyzing and selling user data to boost revenue, trust is emerging as one of the defining issues of the year for the IT sector.

How IT Can Support Reputation Management in Our Social Age

Oracle was in the news for the wrong reason this week when a former employee filed a lawsuit alleging the firm is racist. The incident provides some lessons in image and reputation management in our age of social media and 24-hour news cycles. As it turns out, IT departments can help protect the brand.