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Mike Elgan

Rise of the Planet of the Lockscreens

The humble lockscreen is about to become the most important interface on your smartphone, says columnist Mike Elgan.

Why we need an underground Google

There has never been a search engine that accurately reflects the Internet.

Google shows Apple how to buy a music service

Google's purchase of music streaming service Songza will be a boost for the Google brand as well as its search, Play, Glass and other services. Maybe Apple could learn a thing or two from the deal.

Why Android Wear is the new iPad

Columnist Mike Elgan tested a smartwatch with Android Wear and said he has experienced a culture-changing platform.

Why you shouldn't buy the Amazon Fire phone

Amazon and its Fire phone are capable of the most comprehensive and aggressive personal data harvesting ever offered in any product. The company needs to be far more transparent about what the phone actually does, and how Amazon protects all this data.

Forget coffee, Starbucks is a tech company

People think Starbucks is a coffee company. But every restaurant sells coffee. What makes Starbucks unique is technology. Here's why.

Apple's iBeacon gets fun

Apple's iBeacon location technology used to be ignored or used on boring retail applications. Now it's showing up in consumer apps and being deployed in increasingly fun places.

Get ready for the summer of smartwatches

Smartwatches have been around for a while, but they have been bulky and clunky, and of interest primarily to gadget fans. This summer, all of that will change, says Computerworld columnist Mike Elgan.

The hottest trend in mobile: going offline!

The consumer electronics industry has spent the last 20 years making everything connect wirelessly to the Internet -- from PCs to TVs, cameras to speakers.

How Tom Wheeler's FCC plan will wreck your Internet

FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler's proposal is brilliant because it takes the U.S. as far away from net neutrality as possible by presenting the killing of net neutrality and making it sound like the opposite.

The rise of vagueness as a service

An unexpected trend is emerging in technology. Information presented to the user is growing vague. Columnist Mike Elgan explains why.

Inside Facebook's brilliant plan to hog your data

Facebook's Anonymous Login is designed to create scarcity in the user data market, which increases the value of that data, and forces more small companies to get that data through Facebook's ad network, rather than from the users directly.

Why the social networks are falling apart

The social networks are falling apart -- breaking up into multiple sites and apps that do in a scattered way what used to happen centrally.

3 privacy violations you shouldn't worry about

There are many major threats to our privacy that we should be up in arms about, but iBeacons, Gmail scanning and Google Glass are not among them, says Mike Elgan.

Brace yourself, here comes the mobile appsplosion

Companies are engaged in a kind of arms race with competitors to see how many apps they can get everyone to use. But this aggressive push for more apps is going to end up giving users app fatigue.

4 reasons Microsoft is a new company

There's no question that today's Microsoft is a whole new company. Many of the changes announced under the leadership of CEO Satya Nadella were initiated under his predecessor, Steve Ballmer. But it's clear that it's a whole new Microsoft.

Why Twitter, Facebook, Google and Amazon want to be each other

It was a loony week in Silicon Valley. Four major technology companies announced expensive and risky programs to become less like themselves and more like their competitors.

15 mysteries about the Moto 360 smartwatch

We've seen pictures and videos of Motorola's round smartwatch. But the most important facts are still unknown, and Mike Elgan has a lot of questions.

Ready for your electronic tattoo?

Electronic tattoos are the ultimate wearable computer. There's no telling what a patch of electronics stuck to your body somewhere and connected wirelessly to a smartphone can do once app developers get involved.

How do you feel? Your phone may soon tell you

A variety of projects unveiled in the past year aim to give mobile apps the ability to instantly detect a person's emotional state.

Author Bio

Mike Elgan Mike Elgan writes about technology and tech culture. Contact and learn more about Mike at Elgan.com.