Skip the navigation

Red Hat designs RHEL for a decade-long run

The newly released RHEL 7 includes Docker containers and the new terabyte-scaled XFS file system

By Joab Jackson
June 10, 2014 12:17 PM ET

IDG News Service - Knowing how system administrators enjoy continuity, Red Hat has designed the latest release of its flagship Linux distribution to be run, with support, until 2024.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 (RHEL 7), the completed version of which was shipped Tuesday, also features a number of new technologies that the company sees as instrumental for the next decade, including the Docker Linux Container system and the advanced XFS file system.

"XFS opens the door for a new class of business analytics, big data and data analytics," said Mark Coggin, Red Hat senior director of product marketing.

The last major update to RHEL, RHEL 6, was released in November 2010. Since then, server software has been used in an increasingly wide variety of operational scenarios, including providing the basis for bare metal servers, virtual machines, IaaS (infrastructure-as-a-service) and PaaS (platform-as-a-service) cloud packages.

Red Hat will support RHEL 7 with bug fixes and commercial support for up to 10 years. The company generally releases a major version of RHEL every three years.

In contrast, Canonical's Ubuntu LTS (long-term support) distributions are supported for five years. Suse Enterprise Linux is also supported, in most aspects, for up to 10 years,

This is the first edition to include Docker, a container technology that could act as a nimbler replacement to full virtual machines used in cloud operations. Docker provides a way to package an application in a virtual container so that it can be run across different Linux servers.

Red Hat expects that containers will be widely deployed over the next few years as a way to package and run applications, thanks to their portable nature.

"Customers have told us they are looking for a lighter weight version of developing applications. The applications themselves don't need a full operating system or a virtual machine," Coggin said. The system calls are answered by the server's OS and the container includes only the necessary support libraries and the application. "We only put into that container what we need," he said.

Containers are also easier to maintain because users don't have to worry about updating or patching the full OS within a virtual machine, Coggin said.

Red Hat is also planning a special stripped-down release of RHEL, now code-named RHEL Atomic, which will be a distribution for just running containers. Containers that run on the regular RHEL can easily be transferred to RHEL Atomic, once that OS is available. They will also run on Red Hat OpenShift PaaS.

Red Hat is also supporting Docker through its switch in RHEL 7 to the systemd process manager, replacing Linux's long used init process manager. Systemd "gives the administrator a lot of additional flexibility in managing the underlying processes inside of RHEL. It also has a tie back to the container initiative and is very integral to the way the processes are stood up and managed in containers," Coggin said.

Reprinted with permission from IDG.net. Story copyright 2014 International Data Group. All rights reserved.
Our Commenting Policies