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Healthcare.gov agency seeks CTO, starting pay: $119K

Here's your chance to make sure a bad launch never happens again

January 7, 2014 04:17 PM ET

Computerworld - WASHINGTON - Are you seeking a job in an IT department that recently drew the ire of the President of the United States?

Do you find the idea of testifying before angry lawmakers thrilling?

If you answered "yes" to either of these possible interview questions, then you might be interested in the job of CTO at the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), the agency that had charge of delivering Healthcare.gov.

The closing period, unfortunately, is today. Resumes must be submitted by 11:59 p.m. tonight to receive consideration.

The job pays $119,554 to $165,300.

The agency is seeking, in a job posting, someone with skills that include evaluating legislation and policy, interpreting technical information, preparing briefing documents and serving as a spokesman.

The agency wants someone who has experience leading and managing IT projects and has well-rounded knowledge of every major aspect of IT management.

Two of the top IT positions at the agency, the CTO and CIO, are now filled by acting officials, according to information on the CMS web site. There have been some resignations at the agency since the Healthcare.gov launch.

In what may be a bit of understatement, the CMS listing said the job is an opportunity to "be part of a dynamic, fast-paced, and highly visible organization."

covers cloud computing and enterprise applications, outsourcing, government IT policies, data centers and IT workforce issues for Computerworld. Follow Patrick on Twitter at Twitter @DCgov or subscribe to Patrick's RSS feed Thibodeau RSS. His e-mail address is pthibodeau@computerworld.com.

See more by Patrick Thibodeau on Computerworld.com.

Read more about Government IT in Computerworld's Government IT Topic Center.



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