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Even before NSA scandal, US residents were anxious about privacy breaches

US residents feel that they have little or no control over the type of information that is collected and used

By Loek Essers
June 13, 2013 12:28 PM ET

IDG News Service - Even before bombshell disclosures of the U.S. government's massive collection of Internet and cellphone data, many U.S. residents were concerned about privacy violations.

In a survey conducted just days before reports surfaced about widespread data collection by the National Security Agency, 85% of U.S. residents said they were worried about unauthorized access by the government and corporations to personal information like phone records, emails and Web activity.

Two-thirds of them feel they have little or no control over the type of information that is collected and used by those organizations and almost 60% said that they are unable to correct inaccurate personal information, according to the 17th Allstate/National Journal Heartland Monitor Poll released Thursday.

The survey was conducted between May 29 and June 2 and reveals that more than 20,000 U.S. residents interviewed are anxious about their privacy.

Forty-eight percent of respondents said they had "some" or a "great deal" of trust in the government when it comes to use of their personal data. And 28% of the respondents said they trusted cellphone and Internet services with respect to responsible use of information.

However, not all organizations are seen as untrustworthy. Healthcare providers and employers are seen as the most trustworthy institutions, with 80% saying that they have some or a great deal of trust in them.

Banks and lawyers were also among the most trusted while media and social media companies are distrusted, said Marci Kaminsky, senior vice president of public relations for Allstate Insurance Company, during a webcast presentation of the survey results.

U.S. residents are optimists and see solutions to their privacy worries, but they don't believe the government should meddle more. Very few, just 10%, favor expanded government monitoring of cellphone and email activity. Forty-four percent favor increased camera surveillance of public places, the poll showed. Only 16% of respondents were in favor of "increased censorship of websites and less freedom to access sources on the Internet."

U.S. residents are also worried about privacy for the next generation. Nine in 10 respondents said they have less privacy than previous generations and they also expect the next generation to have even less privacy. A clear majority of 88% said they favor a federal policy that would require the deletion of online information.

Despite the overall discomfort with the collection and usage of information, a majority of respondents recognize that they could benefit from certain forms of personal data collection. More than two-thirds think, for instance, that exposing personal data is a tradeoff for using things like social networking sites and IM/video chat services that let them stay in touch with friends and relatives. They also feel they benefit from relevant, targeted advertising that informs them better about products and services, and offers them deals, the poll showed.

Reprinted with permission from IDG.net. Story copyright 2014 International Data Group. All rights reserved.
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