Skip the navigation

Time to say goodbye to Windows RT tablets?

Some say Microsoft should scrap alternative to Windows 8

May 2, 2013 02:42 PM ET

Computerworld - Windows RT tablets grabbed just 0.4% of the tablet market in the first quarter, a dismal result that led some tech experts to urge Microsoft to scrap the platform that's in its six-month infancy.

"I wouldn't be surprised if they do streamline and do drop [Windows RT]," said Brian Proffitt, an adjunct instructor of management at Notre Dame's Mendoza College of Business , in an interview. "Microsoft is going to remain heavily invested in its Surface tablet strategy, but that doesn't preclude them from making changes and cutting. Cutting Windows RT would be a smart move, unless the number of shipments suddenly improves."

Jack Gold, an analyst at J. Gold Associates, was more blunt: "I believe Microsoft would be much better off killing RT and going with one unified tablet OS [with Windows 8]. The need to support ARM [processors] was why Microsoft went with RT. But it never really worked that well."

IDC said Wednesday that just 200,000 tablets running Windows RT, including Microsoft's own Surface RT, shipped in the first quarter, which was 0.4% of the total market of 49.2 million tablets. Windows RT tablets first started shipping late last October, although Samsung early on decided not to ship a Windows RT tablet in the U.S.

For the first quarter of 2013, Android topped IDC's tally with a 56.5% market share, followed by Apple's iOS with 39.6% and then Windows 8 tablets with 3.3%, which includes Surface Pro tablets from Microsoft.

Microsoft had no comment on Windows RT's future and the IDC rankings. "We have no information to share at this time," a spokesperson said. Windows RT ARM-supplier Qualcomm did not comment.

The problems with Surface RT and other Windows RT tablets are several, analysts said, but a fatal flaw is how the platform won't run traditional desktop apps that Microsoft users want and need.

Users of iPads and Android tablets would expect not to have access to Microsoft desktops apps like the Office software suite, but not Microsoft customers, said Rob Enderle, an analyst at Enderle Group.

"RT was supposed to have a competitive strength with Office, but the most powerful component for Office on a tablet -- given a tablet's limitations -- is Outlook, which RT didn't get," Enderle said. "Tablets are typically used for consumption and email, and RT was going to be light on games and interesting tablet apps because it was late to market. The one advantage RT should have had -- Outlook -- Microsoft denied."

Windows RT is expected to support Outlook eventually, but not until 2014, which may be too late, Enderle said. "Microsoft is still coming from behind, so they need to significantly accelerate improvements or leave the race," Enderle added. "If they aren't willing to do what it takes to win, they should exit and accept that this is another Zune."



Our Commenting Policies