Skip the navigation

Google Glass mysteries revealed!

April 20, 2013 07:00 AM ET

If you make a call or send an email or text message, that communication happens not by Glass alone, but through a smartphone.

One user this week recorded an "unboxing" of Google Glass through Glass itself.

An 'unboxing' of Google Glass through Glass itself

As the unboxing reveals, Glass comes with clip-on sunglasses. In the future, Google may partner with Ray-Ban or Warby Parker to offer prescription eyeglasses with Google Glass electronics built in. Another possibility is a clip-on product that turns regular eyeglasses into Google Glass devices.

The terms of service

Google Mirror API Terms of Service were published this week. Google is banning for early users the resale, loan or transfer of a Glass device without Google's permission. Google reserves the right to remotely de-activate the devices and not give accused violators a refund.

Google is banning monetization by app developers: No charging for apps, no advertising.

Glassware apps don't run on the Glasses, but in the cloud.

No retail ship date or price has been announced, but prognosticators say it could go on sale by the end of this year at the earliest or the end of next year at the latest.

What these facts tell us

Overall, the facts we learned this week tell us that Google is taking a very conservative, controlling approach to the platform.

Instead of flooding the device with features and functions, it's limited to a few common, powerful features. Instead of releasing it to the public, Google is allowing only 10,000 initial users and banning them from selling or sharing the devices.

In other words, Google is taking something of an Apple approach to the new product, which is the right way to go for a product as "different" as Google Glass.

So now that you know what Google Glass is all about, are you interested in buying one for yourself? If not, why not?

writes about technology and tech culture. Contact and learn more about Mike at http://Google.me/+MikeElgan. You can also see more articles by Mike Elgan on Computerworld.com.

Read more about Personal Technology in Computerworld's Personal Technology Topic Center.



Our Commenting Policies