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Cyberwarfare now menacing the enterprise, Kaspersky Lab says

Stuxnet, Flame, Gauss and other state-sponsored cyberwarfare malware is increasingly disrupting operations in organizations

By Joab Jackson
January 31, 2013 04:52 PM ET

IDG News Service - Enterprise security managers have yet another worry to add to their list: cyberwarfare attacks.

 

Now, in addition to guarding against targeted attacks from cybercriminals and activists, enterprise security managers must increasingly guard against potential damage from nation-state cyberwarfare as well, according to the head of research from Kaspersky Labs.

"There are actually a lot of cyber weapons [out there now], but they are very hard to discover," said Costin Raiu, Kaspersky Lab's director of global research, who spoke at the Kaspersky Cyber-Security Summit of 2013 Wednesday.

Raiu pointed to how Red October, software that Kaspersky discovered last year, was surreptitiously monitoring computers for at least five years before it was discovered. "This is really shocking for us. We never expected to live in such a stealthy world where we simply don't know how many other similar attacks are out there," Raiu said.

Malicious software from profit-minded cybercriminals still accounts for the majority of malware in circulation today, but malware developed by the military, military contractors or other government agencies is becoming increasingly prevalent as well. Cyberwarfare takes place when one nation deploys malware to disrupt the activities of another nation. Also related is cyberespionage, where malware is planted on computers to spy on governments, corporations and important people.

While an antivirus vendor's warnings about emerging threats can appear to be self-serving, Kaspersky Lab has had a lot of success in the past few years discovering and helping to understand malware supposedly created by governments for purposes of spying and attacking network infrastructure. And Raiu's remarks have already proved to be timely. On Thursday, the New York Times reported that malicious Chinese hackers, using techniques developed by the Chinese military, had infiltrated its computers.

Raiu pointed to recently discovered malware such as Flame, Gauss, Red October and Stuxnet as examples of cyberwarfare malware.

Such cyberwarfare malware can be better-funded, better written and much more difficult to detect and decode than typical malware. "We are now discovering malware that has been active for [as long as] 10 years," Raiu said. "The malware that comes from the nation-state is completely different from what is produced by cybercriminals," he added.

When Kaspersky first unearthed Flame, which it classified as cyberespionage malware, Raiu estimated that, despite the fact it was only 20MB in size, that it would take up to 10 years to truly understand how it works. "No anti-virus company has figured out how Flame works," Raiu said. "There is so much code, so many subroutines, so much obfuscation and encryption that you need a lot of super highly talented people ... to understand what it does."

Reprinted with permission from IDG.net. Story copyright 2014 International Data Group. All rights reserved.
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