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Intel plans on controlling computers with a dirty look

Chip maker talks about future of 'perceptual computing' at CES

January 8, 2013 04:42 PM ET

Computerworld - Users will some day soon toss aside their keyboard and mouse because their computers will understand their hand gestures and even the look on their face.

That's Intel's vision anyway.

The world's largest chip maker is focusing on perceptual computing at this week's International CES show in Las Vegas.

We'll control our computers in the not-so-distant future with gestures, voice commands and facial expressions, according to Alastair Ong, an Intel demo presenter.

"It's Intel's vision of the future," he said on the show floor. "Right now, we use keyboards and mice. We're moving away from that. We're looking for ways to improve the user experience. What's more empowering than controlling our computers?"

In Intel's vision, if a man is playing a game on his laptop, the computer would recognize if he's looking frustrated and could make the game easier. Or if a woman is baking, the computer would notice that her hands are covered with flour and it would "turn the pages" of the online recipe for her.

Ong said many of the people watching his demo are interested in using perceptual technology for gaming. However, some have asked about using it in advertising.

How would that work? If you look tired, Ong said, you might be shown an ad for coffee.

Perceptual computing
Intel's Alastair Ong controls a computer using hand gestures at International CES in Las Vegas.

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covers the Internet and Web 2.0, emerging technologies, and desktop and laptop chips for Computerworld. Follow Sharon on Twitter at Twitter @sgaudin, on or subscribe to Sharon's RSS feed Gaudin RSS. Her email address is sgaudin@computerworld.com.

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