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Oracle's Sparc SuperCluster due by year end

Oracle released its Sparc T4 processor in standard rack and blade servers, as well as a big clustered system

By James Niccolai
September 26, 2011 10:09 PM ET

IDG News Service - Oracle has launched its new Sparc T4 processor, along with new hardware that it hopes will turn up the heat on server rivals Hewlett-Packard and IBM.

CEO Larry Ellison was, as usual, in feisty form when he took to the stage at Oracle's headquarters Monday to launch the products. He made several bold performance claims and said he's "looking forward" to competing for IBM's customers.

The T4 is the latest addition to the Sparc processor family developed by Sun Microsystems, which Oracle acquired last year. It has eight processor cores, down from 16 in the T3, but each core runs at up to 3GHz, compared to the T3's 1.65Ghz. That helps gives the T4 five-times the single-threaded performance of its predecessor, according to Ellison.

The Sparc T4 is available now in standard rack and blade servers, priced from US$16,000 to $160,000. It will also be used in the Sparc SuperCluster, a high-end system that will pack 1,200 CPU threads in a single system the size of a server rack.

Oracle still won't give pricing for the SuperCluster, which it first talked about last year. Nor would it give a firm ship date, although John Fowler, executive vice president for Oracle's systems group, said in an interview that the product will be out by the end of the year.

It's similar in some ways to Oracle's Exadata Database Machine and Exalogic Elastic Cloud. In all three cases, Oracle says it has tightly engineered the server, storage and network components to optimize performance, and integrated its software on top of that.

But while the Exalogic system is for running middleware and the Exadata machine for data warehousing and online transaction processing, the SuperCluster is designed for general purpose computing, including standard enterprise resource planning applications.

The machine includes four Sparc T4 server nodes, each with four sockets; Infiniband switches; ZFS storage appliances; and Oracle's Exadata storage servers. It can be purchased in a half rack configuration, or as a full rack with 4TB of DRAM and up to 198TB of hard disk space.

Up to eight racks can be linked together with a single system image, Ellison said. "This is a very big machine," he said.

Some of the components overlap with those in the Exadata Database machine. But the SuperCluster has less of Oracle's specialized database storage servers and adds standard storage instead. It also devotes more space to compute power.

"You can add more Exadata storage cells in a second rack if you want to ... but the original rack trades a certain amount of Exadata storage for general storage, to be a more general purpose system," Fowler said in the interview.

Reprinted with permission from IDG.net. Story copyright 2014 International Data Group. All rights reserved.
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