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Groups defend drunk-driving checkpoint software

By Grant Gross
March 23, 2011 05:44 PM ET

Asked if the senators' letter amounted to the government compelling action of the smartphone makers, ACT spokesman Jonathan Godfrey suggested it did. "When the Senate majority leader [Reid] and his senate colleagues send a letter urging you to do something, implicit is that they can have hearings and examine legislative fixes if you don't address their concerns," he said.

When police departments set up DUI checkpoints, they often advertise their plans, added Scott. "All we're doing is we're taking information and pushing it toward the drivers," he said. "A lot of police departments are saying that part of the campaign is awareness. If PhantomALERT gets the word out ... that's going to deter a lot of people from drinking and driving."

PhantomALERT, available since 2008, points out speed traps, red-light cameras, high-accident intersections, speed bumps and other traffic hazards.

Grant Gross covers technology and telecom policy in the U.S. government for The IDG News Service. Follow Grant on Twitter at GrantGross. Grant's e-mail address is grant_gross@idg.com.

Reprinted with permission from IDG.net. Story copyright 2014 International Data Group. All rights reserved.
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