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Groups defend drunk-driving checkpoint software

By Grant Gross
March 23, 2011 05:44 PM ET

IDG News Service - Makers of applications that locate drunk-driving checkpoints are misunderstood, defenders said Wednesday, a day after four U.S. senators called for smartphone makers to pull applications from their services.

The applications do more than identify drunk-driving checkpoints set up by police, and the DUI (driving under the influence) checkpoint functionality actually aids police, said Joe Scott, CEO and founder of PhantomALERT, one of the companies targeted by the senators.

"They're misjudging us," Scott said Wednesday. "It's a safety tool. It's approved by a lot of police departments. How is that we're being sanctioned? It just doesn't make sense."

When users of PhantomALERT report DUI checkpoints, it often appears to users that there are more checkpoints than actually exist, Scott said. The result is the app "deters people from drinking and driving," he added. "We're like a force multiplier for them."

The Association for Competitive Technology (ACT), a Washington, D.C., trade group, also questioned the request from Senators Harry Reid of Nevada, Charles Schumer of New York, Frank Lautenberg of New Jersey and Tom Udall of New Mexico. The four Democrats sent a letter to smartphone software vendors Apple, Google and Research In Motion Tuesday, asking them to stop selling DUI checkpoint apps.

The letter didn't name the DUI checkpoint software, but PhantomALERT was one of several companies targeted, a Senate spokeswoman said. Similar software includes Cobra's iRadar, Trapster and Fuzz Alert.

On Wednesday, the senators reported that RIM would remove the DUI checkpoint apps. "Drunk drivers will soon have one less tool to evade law enforcement and endanger our friends and families," the senators said in a statement. "We appreciate RIM's immediate reply and urge the other smartphone makers to quickly follow suit."

But the apps in question contain publicly available information provided by police departments as well as reports from drivers, said Morgan Reed, ACT's executive director. The social-networking and law enforcement information makes the apps very popular, he said.

"While I applaud the senators for seeking to curb drunk driving, their criticism of online travel apps misses the point," he said. "Law enforcement authorities have embraced these services, expressing their strong approval for products that reduce speeding and improve traffic safety."

The apps provide drivers warnings about other potential roadway problems, Reed said. "Any one of the programs' users can submit a warning about a traffic obstruction as simply as e-mailing a friend or posting a message on their Facebook profile," he added. "The suggestion that the government should compel Apple, RIM, or other mobile application stores to block programs that simply allow users to report information based on location is misguided at best. Having the government act as arbiter of which products should be sold in stores is a slippery slope that few would welcome."

Reprinted with permission from IDG.net. Story copyright 2014 International Data Group. All rights reserved.
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