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Oracle CEO, set to buy Sun, hails Java at conference

By Paul Krill
June 2, 2009 04:44 PM ET

InfoWorld - Reassuring the Java community, Oracle Corp. CEO Larry Ellison pledged a commitment to Java technologies, including the budding JavaFX rich media extension to Java, today at the JavaOne conference in San Francisco.

Oracle is in the process of buying Sun Microsystems Inc. for $7.4 billion. Ellison was brought up on stage by Sun chairman and co-founder Scott McNealy, who suggested Ellison's friendship with Apple CEO Steve Jobs might help get Java onto the Apple iPhone, something that Apple hasn't let happen despite Sun's interest in doing so.

[ For the full scoop on Oracle agrees to buy Sun for $7.4, see InfoWorld's special report | Stay up to date on more developments from the JavaOne conference. ]

"We see increased investments in Java coming from the Sun-Oracle combination and an expansion of the overall community and we're very excited about that," Ellison said.

Ellison said Oracle's middleware strategy "is based 100 percent on Java."

"Java was a very attractive platform for us because it was open and it allowed us to extend the platform," he said. "Our whole next generation of business applications, something we call the Fusion suite of applications, is built entirely on Java."

"We think it's going to be very attractive to our customers and to the community," Ellison said.

Ellison said Sun and James Gosling, Sun vice president and the founder of Java, have done a fantastic job inventing, expanding, and opening up Java and giving it to the world. "We're going to do more of the same," Ellison said.

He also gave a thumbs-up to JavaFX and expressed hope that JavaFX could supersede AJAX development because a lot of programmers do not want to program in AJAX.

"Going to JavaFX is going to allow us to build fantastic UIs in Java," said Ellison.

"We're very committed to seeing JavaFX exploited throughout Oracle and throughout Sun," Ellison said. He also said he would like to see OpenOffice group libraries based on JavaFX.

He also expressed intentions to aggressively develop Java applications for devices such as phones and netbooks. "There will be computers fundamentally based on Java and JavaFX, not only from Google but also from Sun," he said, referring to reports of netbooks to be based on Google Android and Java.

Sun at JavaOne unveiled JavaFX 1.2, featuring a cross-platform UI library and support for Real Time Streaming Protocol. The company also unveiled a JavaFX authoring tool now in a preview mode but due to ship by the end of the year.

Before introducing Ellison, McNealy said the planned merger was "absolutely a good thing."

While not mentioning the iPhone by name, McNealy noted there is a particular device that did not run Java. "There's a really great friendship that we might exploit here in the Java community between Larry and Steve. If you could just talk to him, Larry, that would be just great," McNealy said.

Reprinted with permission from InfoWorld. Story copyright 2012 InfoWorld Media Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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