Paul Glen

Columnist

Paul Glen is the CEO of Leading Geeks, an education and consulting firm devoted to improving collaboration between technical and nontechnical groups and people.

Retention, by stages

Troubled versus toxic teams

Troubled versus toxic teams

It can be hard to tell the difference in the midst of day-to-day activities, but it’s important to know the level of your team’s dysfunction.

Lessons for leaving

Lessons for leaving

The parting of employees and employers can be a revelation about what each values.

Is anyone listening?

Is anyone listening?

In IT, we’ve all had the sensation that business people haven’t really heard what we’ve told them. Here’s how you can be sure to grab their attention.

Managers: Don’t ask if you don’t want to know

Managers: Don’t ask if you don’t want to know

Everyone likes being consulted ahead of a big decision. But asking staff for opinions when you have no intention of really considering them is worse than not asking at all.

You have the power. Should you use it?

You have the power. Should you use it?

For decades, power has been accruing to employers at the expense of employees. But managers and companies that exploit this new imbalance need to consider the costs of doing so.

When the call to management comes

When the call to management comes

Entering the management track can sneak up on you — you’re not likely to be asked point-blank, ‘Do you want to be a manager?’ That’s why you should ask yourself that question now, before the opportunity presents itself.

People screw up; don’t make it worse

People screw up; don’t make it worse

Managers need to be aware of the messages they send in reacting to an employee’s failure.

Communication is a problem that can’t be fixed

Communication is a problem that can’t be fixed

That’s frustrating to us geeks, because to us, all problems have solutions.

Overcoming our auto-petulance

Overcoming our auto-petulance

We all are asked to do things we don’t want to do at work. If your reaction is to just not do them, you are in danger of harming more than just your career.

Ideas are better than ideology

Ideas are better than ideology

Using a core set of beliefs about the right way to do things can seem like the most professional approach to evaluating ideas. It isn’t.

Read this! (And learn how to deliver ultimatums better.)

Read this! (And learn how to deliver ultimatums better.)

On most projects, it’s we in IT who have to tell our partners when they need to do something. What we don’t realize is that they hear a silent “or else” at the end of what we think of as statements of fact.

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