Michael Horowitz

Michael Horowitz wrote his first computer program in 1973 and has been a computer nerd ever since. He spent 20 years working in an IBM mainframe environment as both an application developer and a DB2 DBA. He then spent a few years working in the Research and Development group of a large Wall Street firm. He has also done technical writing and teaching. He is an independent consultant who has long been focused on Defensive Computing. His personal site is michaelhorowitz.com. This is a weblog of Michael Horowitz. The opinions expressed here are those of Michael Horowitz and may not represent those of Computerworld.


Blocking JavaScript can stop some Windows malware

Blocking JavaScript can stop some Windows malware

Windows users need to defend against a relatively new attack, JavaScript files attached to email messages. One defense is to open JavaScript files with Notepad, but a more thorough defense is to disable Windows_Script_Host entirely.

Lessons and observations from the GoToMyPC incident

Citrix did not distinguish itself in the way it handled a recent security incident. Then too, neither did the press.

Windows 10 forced updates -- lots of blame to go around

Sure the way Microsoft dealt with Windows 10 upgrades was wrong. But, anyone who got burned by it needs to take a good look in the mirror. They were warned.

Upgrading to Windows 10 and questioning <i>The New York Times</i>

Upgrading to Windows 10 and questioning <i>The New York Times</i>

Recently, The New York Times featured an article about Why Windows 10 Upgrades Go Wrong, and How to Avoid It, that contained some questionable claims while leaving out important points. I try to set the record straight.

A web page consumes a constant 25% of the CPU -- after it has loaded

A web page consumes a constant 25% of the CPU -- after it has loaded

An article on NewYorker.com just won't quit. Well after the page has loaded, it continues to consume large amounts of CPU. Block the ads, all is well. Where does this end?

Dealing with a problematic Chromebook: Part 2

Dealing with a problematic Chromebook: Part 2

What to do when powerwashing a Chromebook fails to fix a problem.

Dealing with a problematic Chromebook: Part 1

Dealing with a problematic Chromebook: Part 1

What to do when a Chromebook goes on the fritz? One particular set of problems was solved with a Powerwash -- sort of.

Windows Update on Windows 7 is still a problem

Windows Update on Windows 7 is still a problem

Even after installing the four patches I discussed last time, Windows Update on Windows 7 still runs slow when installing the May 2016 patches. But, as before, there's a patch for that. And, dealing with Windows Update when you don't...

The shame of Windows Update

The shame of Windows Update

Windows Update for Windows 7 has been around a long time with a mission that hasn't changed. So why is it still so flawed?

Patching Windows 7 can be painfully slow

Patching Windows 7 can be painfully slow

Windows Update on Windows 7 is taking forever to figure out the patches that need to be installed. Last month, Ed Bott suggested fixes to Windows Update, more recently Woody Leonhard suggested still more fixes. Way to go Microsoft.

An experiment with a secure web browser fails

Chromebooks offer great security and they can be remotely controlled with Chrome Remote Desktop. Sounds great, but my experience in the trenches was sub-optimal.

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