You've just got to go through the proper channels

IT pilot fish is working for a very big technology company as the first contact for resolving problems -- especially for business customers who tend to be lagging technology adopters.

"That meant when they adopted anything new, it was long after the general release," says fish. "So most of my calls had little or nothing to do with the quality of our software, but generally involved application developer errors.

"Often the error was writing over our transaction application registers, which was fairly obvious upon opening the dump.

"In one case I found two registers overwritten with text. I asked the lead customer contact about it, but he and his team pleaded 'not mine.'

"But the problem didn't go away. I kept asking, and they kept denying they knew anything about it. This went on for months, but short of roaming the coding floor I had little chance to track this down.

"Finally I was about to move on in my career, and my boss told me I had to resolve this.

"This time I went to the customer's IT director and showed him the latest iteration of the problem, which hadn't changed a bit from months prior.

"He took one look at it, called one of his developers in and within two minutes we had the culprit.

"The problem was fixed, and I was soon on my way to a new job -- and could leave these guys to my replacement."

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