Microsoft releases 15 Office patches for July, but some June bugs still stink

Embarrassing Office 2010 fix—KB 4011042—doesn’t make the main listing

Microsoft releases 15 Office patches for July, but some June bugs still stink
Credit: Jackie Flynt

On Patch Wednesday of this week, Microsoft said it released 14 non-security Office updates, covering such fascinating topics as improved Dutch translations in Word 2013, Danish translations in Access, and Finnish and Swedish translations in Excel. Typical first Tuesday stuff.

Microsoft neglected to mention that it also shipped a fix for the bugs introduced by last month’s patches to Outlook 2010. Dubbed KB 4011042, the neglected fix appears to be a non-security patch that fixes bugs created by a security patch—a red flag for many advanced patchers.

Microsoft released a “fix” that was supposed to take care of this group of bugs on June 27, 2017—KB 3015545—but quickly pulled the patch when it started crashing 32-bit versions of Outlook 2010. Thus, this week’s non-security update KB 4011042 is a fix for a bug in a bug fix for a botched security patch.

Many of the bugs introduced by Office patches in June, identified by Microsoft late last month, are still active. Using Microsoft’s terminology:

  • Introduced Bug #1 — Error when opening an attachment in an email, contact or task formatted as Rich Text. Has not been fixed for Outlook 2007.
  • Introduced Bug #2 — Opening Mail Attachment warning when opening an attachment that includes consecutive periods (...) or exclamation point (!). Has not been fixed for Outlook 2007.
  • Introduced Bug #4 — VBScript does not run, or you receive malicious code warning when using a custom form for Outlook. “Investigating this issue.”
  • Introduced Bug #6 — iCloud fails to load properly in Outlook 2007. Has not been fixed.

The other bugs have been fixed by an assortment of Office patches released on June 27 and 30, as well as fixes to Windows that you may or may not have installed: For Win 7 and 8.1, the latest cumulative update (er, Quality Rollup) suffices, as does the recent cumulative update for Win10 Creators Update, version 1703. On the other hand, if you want to fix earlier versions of Windows 10, you’ll have to manually install the latest updates.

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