It ain't broke, so fix it -- right now!

This company makes a corporate decision to go 100-percent Microsoft .NET for its web app development -- and that's a problem for the pilot fish who's responsible for the existing versions of some of those apps.

"I had spent 11 years developing open-source web apps with corporate blessing in my branch location, using WAMP -- Windows, the Apache web server, the MySQL database and PHP," says fish.

"I had customized one app for a different plant location a thousand miles away. I had written another at corporate HR's request, to provide an employee satisfaction survey and reports. I was told that my work would now need to be converted to .NET."

Will I get another 11 years to to move them over, fish asks? Make it happen ASAP, say the higher-ups. Like, yesterday.

So fish goes to work. But it takes a year to move just the simpler apps over to .NET -- the ones for things like alphanumeric paging and salaried time-off requests.

And after a year, it's clear that corporate isn't pleased with the progress. Word comes down of a major reorg of IT processes in the company's manufacturing plants -- with everyone on the plants' IT teams getting reorged out of their jobs.

The good news: There are new corporate jobs available for qualified team members. But as it happens, for the nine IT team members who lose their jobs at the plant where fish works, there are only eight corporate positions available.

Guess who doesn't get a chair when the music stops?

"Long story short, they successfully eliminated the pesky, slow open-source guy from their Microsoft mix," grumbles fish.

"It's been five years, and insiders tell me that the plant largely runs their production and engineering departments on a half-dozen WAMP apps, developed by me back in the day. And the employee satisfaction survey is still operating at the enterprise level, still using PHP, MySQL and Apache.

"Apparently, they weren't as eager to move my apps to .NET as they claimed."

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