Phil Schiller: Apple "committed as ever" to desktop Macs

And reveals Apple has had more MacBook Pro orders than any other pro notebook before

Apple, Mac, MacBook Pro, Mac Pro, OS X, iMac, Mac mini

Apple's MacBook Pro kills the password, function key, Escape key, dedicated charging port, USB-A port and SD card.

 

 

Credit: Apple

Apple VP worldwide marketing, Phil Schiller, spoke exclusively to The Independent this week, taking the chance to offer the commitment pro users need if they are wondering about the fate of the desktop Mac:

Love the Mac

"We love the Mac and are as committed to it, in both desktops and notebooks, as we ever have been," he said.

Given Schiller made this statement yesterday it makes sense to see this as an attempt to offer a little reassurance to pro users who remain disappointed at the lack of news about Mac Pro, iMac or Mac mini models at last week’s MacBook Pro launch.

Schiller admitted the level of criticism the company has seen with this release “surprised” him. “We know we made good decisions about what to build into the new MacBook Pro and that the result is the best notebook ever made,” he said.

Despite the critics, Schiller points out that customers seem to agree with Apple, it turns out the company has had more orders for the new MacBook Pro than any other pro notebook before, he said.

Courage and pride

He’s proud of the product, too, pouring praise on Apple’s engineering and product design teams, “It took a level of engineering not possible before,” he said, referring (I presume) to design features like the internal hooks which keep the chassis together while also keeping it solid.

“The level of engineering it takes to make this the way it is, is a tremendous technical challenge compared to the past,” he said.

Apple introduced its new MacBook Pro models at a special event last week. The “Hello Again” event coincided with the 25th anniversary of the world’s first mobile Mac. The company used the event to articulate a vision in which nuanced touch becomes part of the UI, in the form of the much-discussed Touch Bar.

Change management

Schiller also seems to accept that some of the decisions the company has made, such putting touch inside its pro notebook, adopting USB-C, and design limitations such as the 16GB RAM limit, mean the company needs to give a little guidance to users, "We care about what they love and what they are worried about. And it's our job to help people through these changes," he said.

Schiller also said the Mac experience is now “dominated” by Apple’s notebooks, but his promise that Apple cares about both desktop and notebook Macs suggests the company will have news to share with desktop users soon. He also said that the company has no plans to merge the iOS and macOS platforms, but to make them into harmonious but different companions.

Given that speculation had favored introduction of new desktops at last week’s event, some online Apple watchers have speculated that current processor supplier, Intel, delayed the company’s plans.

Echoes

If true that reflects a terrible echo from the days of the AIM Alliance, when Apple once again found its intentions for its platform curtailed by the limitations of its processor supply partners. This may also inform any future intentions the company may harbor for processor development and supply.

Meanwhile, it seems, Mac Pro, iMac and (hopefully) Mac mini users can look forward to improvements to their chosen form factors relatively soon.

Google+? If you use social media and happen to be a Google+ user, why not join AppleHolic's Kool Aid Corner community and join the conversation as we pursue the spirit of the New Model Apple?

Got a story? Drop me a line via Twitter or in comments below and let me know. I'd like it if you chose to follow me on Twitter so I can let you know when fresh items are published here first on Computerworld.

To express your thoughts on Computerworld content, visit Computerworld's Facebook page, LinkedIn page and Twitter stream.
Windows 10 annoyances and solutions
Shop Tech Products at Amazon
Notice to our Readers
We're now using social media to take your comments and feedback. Learn more about this here.