Mingis on Tech: Cars and autonomous driving don't always mix

Even as Tesla's Autopilot tech comes under increased scrutiny after a handful of well-publicized accidents, automakers are moving forward with plans for autonomous fleets and even smarter cars

If you've heard about the latest advances in autonomous driving it's natural to assume driverless cars are just around the corner -- perhaps waiting to pick you up.

Tesla's Autopilot is already in use on the nation's highways (and sometimes getting into accidents). Ford is planning to build a fleet of autonomous vehicles for services like Uber. And other automakers are lining up tech partners so they can add safe-driving features -- everything from lane-keeping, to radar-controlled cruise control to automatic braking -- to their vehicles.

But truly autonomous driving -- the sit-back, relax, and-leave-the-driving-to-the-car kind -- isn't likely to arrive until later in the 2020s. If we're lucky.

Turns out the technology -- the cameras, sensors and computer hardware -- is fine. It's when people get involved that things can get messy.

Computerworld Senior Writer Lucas Mearian explains to Executive News Editor (and car tech fan) Ken Mingis why it's one mile forward, two back, for autonomous driving.

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