8 noteworthy improvements in the Windows 10 Anniversary Update

You have lots of good stuff to look forward to in the next major release of Windows 10. Here are the highlights.

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Since the initial release of Windows 10 last July, Microsoft has been working to improve the look and feel of its flagship desktop operating system and has solicited user input and feedback through the Windows Feedback app, which has been integrated into all Windows 10 versions. And the company shows every sign of reading, considering and often acting upon user requests for interface changes and improvements. Thus, you'll see lots helpful, if small, changes to the Windows 10 UI, as the company works to complete what is now called the "Anniversary Update," which will be released on August 2. Here are the most noteworthy of those changes and additions.

Microsoft Edge: Extensions and more

The Microsoft Edge browser is meant to improve upon and replace Internet Explorer. While users have not been as quick to adopt Edge as the company would like, the upcoming version may help to change that. The long-promised browser extensions for Edge have finally started to appear in the Windows Store.

Most notably, these include the following:

  • Office Online: A plug-in for Edge that enables you to access Word, Excel, PowerPoint, OneNote and Sway online without requiring Office to be installed (and without access to a valid Office 365 subscription). This makes offline access to these Office components unworkable, however.
  • LastPass: A market-leading password manager, LastPass securely stores all of your passwords and makes them available on any computer or mobile device with internet access.
  • AdBlock: Enables you to turn off web-based advertising on the pages you visit. The absence of this capability kept many users from adopting Edge, or even trying it out, so support for two popular AdBlock implementations should help to remedy this omission going forward.

So far, there are fewer than a dozen Edge extensions available. But now that they're available through the Windows Store, that number should start climbing rapidly.

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