'We don't care. We don't have to.'


This network provider's customer is moving to the building next door -- just about 50 feet, says a pilot fish working on the job.

"We called up the telco to verify phone line cutover and DSL availability so we could schedule the move," fish says.

"The telco said moving next door changes where the local switching takes place, so the current phone numbers won't work and they'll need to get new numbers, and that will take an additional six to eight weeks."

What about DSL service for that building? fish asks. We'll need to send that question over to engineering and get back to you, telco rep says.

A few weeks pass. There's no word on DSL, so fish calls again. Rep says they must have lost the work order. He'll reissue it and they'll call when there's word.

A couple weeks more, and the customer is ready to move. Another call to the telco about DSL. Rep says they must have the lost work order again.

Meanwhile, fish checks on cable Internet service, which the customer has been using at the old office. But the cable provider rep says that 50 feet is too far away to add an additional coax run. Rep suggests putting in a new cable run under the parking lot -- for $5,000.

That's a little puzzling to fish, since he knows there's a shared carport between the buildings -- and there's already cabling running between the buildings.

"I brought in a cabling contractor and had him do a Cat-5 run between the buildings, and voila! Internet for the new office courtesy of a spare port on the old office's switch," says fish.

"Oh yeah -- three months after the move, a telco tech called from the customer site to ask where I wanted the DSL."

Sharky cares a lot about your true tale of IT life. So send it to me at sharky@computerworld.com. You'll get a stylish Shark shirt if I use it. Add your comments below, and read some great old tales in the Sharkives.

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