Now Huawei sues Samsung on patents -- break out the popcorn

Huawei says Samsung stole its tech. It’s China v Korea in latest IP war.

Huawei Samsung
Credit: Kurush Pawar (cc:by-sa)

Huawei alleges Samsung has used its patented technology without licensing it. Huawei asks Courts in the USA and China to decide the rights and wrongs.

But Samsung denies it, threatening retaliation. Your humble blogwatcher curated these bloggy bits for your entertainment.

In IT Blogwatch, bloggers sit back and enjoy the fight. Not to mention: ST:TMP sins


What’s the craic? Yimou Lee, Anne Marie Roantree, and Se Young Lee report—Huawei files patent suits against Samsung:

Huawei Technologies...sued Samsung Electronics [for] infringement of smartphone patents. [This is its] first intellectual property challenge against the world's top mobile maker.

[It] marks a reversal of roles. [Chinese] smartphone makers have grown rapidly in recent years but different...laws outside of China have slowed overseas expansion.

Last year, Shenzhen-based Huawei invested...$9.2 billion, or 15 percent of annual revenue, in [R&D], the company said. [And it] said it has been granted 50,377 patents globally.


Will Sammy sit there and take it? Kim Young-won won the interwebs: [You're fired -Ed.]

“We will take countermeasures, including a lawsuit,”...Ahn Seong-ho, head of Samsung’s intellectual property division, told reporters. ... In San Francisco, Huawei claimed that Samsung infringed...11 patents related to [LTE] on 4G mobile devices.

The same case was also filed in Shenzhen. ... A Samsung spokesperson declined to further elaborate.


What could "Countermeasures" mean?. Andrew Grush analyzes—Samsung threatens countersuit:

A lawsuit of its own [would be] standard procedure. ... Samsung is quite versed in the art of patent war.

The specific patents involved have yet to be revealed. ... at least some of the patents that Samsung violated are classed as [FRAND] – meaning that Huawei offers the license [for a] reasonable price.


So what does Huawei want? Abner Li unpicks the reportage—Huawei sues Samsung:

Filed in the United States and China, the lawsuits seeks compensation. [But] Ding Jianxing, president of Huawei’s Intellectual Property Rights Department [said] Huawei is not seeking a payment, but rather an agreement to use Samsung’s technology.


I wish we knew more details of the complaint. Ina Fried chickens out:

[In] the publicly available...version of the U.S. lawsuit...not only are some details [redacted], but [so is] one of the causes of action. ... Huawei [has] another claim that is apparently too secret for the world to know.


Who will shepherd us through the story? Wade Shepard will—China's Huawei 'Growing Up':

Last week I walked into a [store] in Tallinn, Estonia and saw...an even mix of Huawei and Samsung. The salesman spoke positively. ... “They’ve just grown up.” ... In two or three years Huawei aims to topple Apple.

Dumping their previous business model of flooding the planet with cheap [phones], Huawei has risen to become a globally recognizable brand. [It] is now the world’s number three smartphone brand.

In 1987, Huawei started out as a producer of phone switches. ... Last year, the company sold 108 million...smartphones. [Q1] saw 28.8 million phones sold, more than a 10 million...increase, while Samsung stayed flat and Apple actually [shrank].


And Finally…

Everything Wrong With Star Trek: The Motion Picture
[occasional mild swearing]


You have been reading IT Blogwatch by Richi Jennings, who curates the best bloggy bits, finest forums, and weirdest websites… so you don’t have to. Catch the key commentary from around the Web every morning. Hatemail may be directed to @RiCHi or itbw@richi.uk.
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