10 things to do before, during and after your performance review

Performance reviews can be nerve-wracking and many workers struggle with the process. Here are ten tips to make sure your next performance review is productive and fulfilling.

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While many organizations are experimenting with the notion of eliminating traditional performance reviews, most companies are still doing annual or semi-annual reviews. The process can be nerve-wracking and cause anxiety if employees don't know what to expect or aren't prepared, but it doesn't have to be like this.

"The most important thing to remember is that these reviews are supposed to be a two-way street with communication flowing both ways, between employee and manager or supervisor. And while, yes, it can be an anxious event, in the end, remember that you both want the same thing -- success and productivity within the organization," says Dominque Jones, chief people officer and vice president of HR at Halogen Software. Here, Jones shares her tips for making sure your next performance review process is productive, fulfilling and successful.

Before:

1. Schedule the meeting well in advance

First and foremost, make sure you're scheduling your performance review well in advance, says Jones. Leave ample time to prepare yourself and get in the right frame of mind to go in eager to learn about your strengths, weaknesses and successes and how you can improve even further. "This is important so that you're not scrambling at the last minute to come up with information. You also should pay attention to your own frame of mind -- if you go in with the intent that this is going to be productive, helpful to you, that the process is designed to support you, then the whole experience is going to be much more pleasant and engaging," Jones says.

Often times, performance reviews will have a self-evaluation component -- don't rush through these, or skimp on details, as your own perceptions and insight into your performance and your talents are just as important as your supervisors' perceptions, she says.

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