22 Apple facts we’ve learned this week

Apple has published a huge quantity of useful information.

Apple, iOS, OS X, security, environment
Credit: Apple

Apple released a host of deeply interesting internal information recently, but much of this was masked by news of WWDC and other big events. So I’ve pulled together a few highlights in case you missed them.


A host of information was included within Apple’s latest Transparency Report, what follows are just a few significant highlights to the report, which you can take a look at yourself right here:

  • Apple received over 30,000 law enforcement requests
  • A tiny 178 of these requests were emergency requests made in order to prevent imminent death or injury to a person. All the rest seemed to relate to snooping.
  • Apple complied with up to 82 percent of these requests – most of these relate to lost or stolen devices.
  • The company received between 1,250 and 1,499 National Security Requests
  • It is interesting that Apple received more requests concerning lost or stolen devices from the UK than China.
  • What’s more interesting that the UK (208) is second only to the US (1,015) in requesting information about a holder’s iCloud account. For comparison, China made just 32 such requests (albeit for a large number of accounts).


Apple gave analyst Ben Bajarin what must have been a fascinating insight into how it handles security and its commitment to delivering industry-leading security in products that remain easy-to-use. As you’d expect there were a host of interesting snippets to be learned (including the “average user unlocks their iPhone 80 times per day snippet that’s been going around). A few more bits of data to stimulate your thinking:

  • 89% of their users with a Touch ID-capable device have set it up and use it
  • Because it owns all the technology, Apple is able to encrypt every single file on your iOS device, while at present it can only encrypt the storage disk on a Mac.


Apple also published its ninth Environmental Responsibility Report. I always go through this as it’s always packed with interesting insights, such as:

  • Apple recovered $40 million of gold from recycling products (Fairphone reckons each smartphone contains around 30 milligrams of gold.)
  • Apple also recovered around $6 million of copper.
  • Apple expects iPhones, iPads and Apple Watches to have a three-year usable life, with Macs expected to last four years.
  • Apple retail stores are switching to use biodegradable paper bags, and the company diverted over 89 million pounds of e-waste from landfills.
  • Apple’s robots can disassemble an iPhone every 11 seconds.
  • Appe’s Chinese iPhone factories should all be powered by the Sun within two years.
  • Since 2008 Apple has cut the average total power consumed by its products by 64 percent
  • Facetime, Siri or iMessage traffic is handled by data servers running 100 percent renewable energy.
  • All Apple’s data centers, corporation offices and retail stores in the US, UK, China, and Australia are 100 percent powered by renewable energy.

Go read the document, there’s so much more.


On media: Apple is determined to become a key player in television and is meeting with TV talent in an attempt to put together a numerous TV shows it hopes will be addictive as some of the best self-made programming you may already enjoy from Amazon or Netflix.

On Apple Car: Apple is now alleged to have a secret development facility in Europe where it is working with an Austrian manufacturer on some element of its Apple Car project. And it recently hired a top cat from Tesla.

On Apps: Apple has a secret team working to improve discoverability at the App Store.

On hardware: TSMC will begin 7nm trial production next year. Look forward to even faster Apple solutions soon after that as this feeds into A-series processor development.

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