Sorta like the boy who paged wolf

Flashback to the early 1990s, when this pilot fish is working for a big computer maker, supporting its manufacturing processes.

"We were given beepers so we could be alerted more easily if one of the machines on a production line were to go down," says fish. "As a whole, things ran pretty smoothly and we didn't get a lot of paged alerts."

That is, until the day fish and his cohorts start getting a steady stream of pages, asking them to call in and report to the production-line supervisor with their location in the facility and what they're doing.

What's going on? fish wonders. With all these pages, there must be major problems somewhere in the plant -- although there are no issues in evidence where he is.

Then he starts to compare notes with his co-workers.

"We realized it was this new production-line supervisor who had just come aboard," fish says. "The guy who was doing all this paging -- wanting to know what we were doing and where in the facility we were -- wasn't even our manager.

"At that point we started just ignoring his pages..."

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