Windows 10 release date is delayed -- unless you're ''special'' [u]

Terry Myerson is such a big tease

Windows 10 release date Terry Myerson MSFT

“We are humbled by your excitement and we can’t wait to deliver Windows 10 to you soon. ... We will notify you when Windows 10 is ready for your PC.”

The Windows 10 release date is supposedly July 29 -- that's what we were told, but it's not so simple, it turns out. It's looking like it's delayed, if you read between the lines.

Terry Myerson, Microsoft's Windows honcho, says the plebs have to wait in line, behind 5 million "insiders." And volume-license availability won't be until next month, neither.

What a mess. And this hot on the heels of the ridiculous faux pas around who gets a free upgrade.

Can't Microsoft get anything right? Is the company genetically incapable of explaining the simplest process?

Good grief. In IT Blogwatch, bloggers furiously facepalm. Not to mention: How to troll a dance-music producer...

curated these bloggy bits for your entertainment. 
[Updated 7.23am PDT to add today's And Finally, and 11.37am with more analysis]

Shira Ovide scratches her head:

[It will] be less of a big bang and more of a rolling wave. ... Windows boss Terry Myerson...gave new details about how Microsoft planned to launch Windows 10 [saying] not everyone who wanted to download [it] would be able to...July 29.

A Microsoft spokeswoman declined to describe how many users would be served in each wave, how the waves would be scheduled, how many waves were expected. ... She said it was too early to say.  MORE

Alex Wilhelm seems more certain:

After some general market confusion and bad headline writing, Microsoft...detailed how it will roll out Windows 10.

If you are a current Windows 10 tester, you win! ... The rest of the public will have to wait and chill. ... Volume license customers...can snag Windows 10 on August 1st. [And] the kids that make computers get the code before you, as usual.  MORE

Microsoft EVP Terry "really pleased" Myerson enumerates the anointed:

We can’t wait to deliver innovations like Cortana, Windows Hello, Microsoft Edge, Continuum, and so much more...on July 29.

We will start rolling out Windows 10 to our Windows Insiders. From there, we will start notifying reserved systems in waves, slowly...once our compatibility work confirms you will have a great experience.

The Windows as a service model extends to our enterprise and business customers as well. We’ve announced new servicing benefits, such as Windows Update for Business. ... Volume licensing customers will be able to download [it from the] Volume Licensing Service Center (VLSC) starting on August 1.  MORE

So Mary Jo Foley still has unanswered questions:

I have asked when MSDN/TechNet and BizSpark users will be able to get Windows 10, but still can't get any clarity on that.  MORE

But her chum Paul Thurrott calls Microsoft "dishonest":

Not everyone who has reserved a copy of Windows 10 will actually get it on day one [like] a great moment from...Seinfeld, where Jerry arrives at the rental car counter to find that the car he reserved is in fact not available:

“See, you know how to take the reservation, you just don’t know how to hold the reservation. And that’s really the most important part of the reservation, the holding.”

Point being, when you say you’re going to do something, you do it. [But the] initial announcement [said] “On July 29, you can get Windows 10 for PCs and tablets by taking advantage of the free upgrade offer.” ... Not “On or soon after July 29.” 

When you make a big public announcement and then casually and subtly backtrack on’re being dishonest.  MORE

And Gordon Kelly calls it the "latest Microsoft blooper":

The vast majority of upgraders will actually have to wait in line. ... How long? Myerson doesn’t say. [His] blog post is representative of wider Microsoft failings...most notably a complete failure to clearly convey the launch details themselves. ... So much so Microsoft has had to come out and apologise for its inability to explain terms which are actually very simple.

As such the Microsoft Windows 10 saga continues: the difficult bit – the OS – looks great, the easy bit – the communication - has been a complete disaster.  MORE

Meanwhile, Woody Leonhard thinks back:

Can you imagine Steve Sinofsky writing a blog post like this?  MORE

Update: Your humble blogwatcher answers FAQs and thinks about this some more:

The outpouring of angst about this wouldn't be a big deal if this was the first such semantic faux pas around Windows 10. I feel the underlying issue is that Microsoft seems incapable of clearly explaining these simple things.

It would have made perfect sense to have given the RTM candidate build to testers early. And I could easily believe that it was the original plan, but then something bad happened with the bug telemetry -- did you notice we just saw three Fast-ring builds in quick succession? ... This isn't just a perceived delay due to semantics, but also an actual schedule delay.

On the question of whether Microsoft has enough bandwidth to service all the downloads: I don't think that's the issue. The Windows 10 updater includes peer-to-peer mesh downloading, Bittorrent-style. I'd speculate that the reservation downloader app does, too.  MORE

And Finally...
DJs From Mars troll every dance-music producer ever
[occasional slightly-NSFW bits]

You have been reading IT Blogwatch by , who curates the best bloggy bits, finest forums, and weirdest websites… so you don't have to. Catch the key commentary from around the Web every morning. Hatemail may be directed to @RiCHi or Opinions expressed may not represent those of Computerworld. Ask your doctor before reading. Your mileage may vary. E&OE.

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